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Winter-Spring 2021 Projects

This year’s ELP offerings include a wide range of structures to provide a variety of opportunities to best suit individual student goals and circumstances in our COVID-19 era. We have entirely remote projects and hybrid projects that include field work. Projects are either one-term or two-terms long. Importantly, most projects will address the critical socio-ecological of our times including wildfire recovery and diversity, equity and inclusion.

WINTER 2021 PROJECT – Apply Now!

One term; Remote Community Engagement Project: For this project, you will enroll in ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits) during Winter term.

Sharing Science Team. This team will learn science communication methods with a focus on museum interpretation. Your mission is to conduct research and write compelling website labels for select collections (bird eggs, bird nests, skulls and petrified wood) in the UO’s Museum of Natural and Cultural History web galleries. You will also propose designs and ideas for making these web galleries more interactive and engaging. This team may also do background research for a planned exhibit on the McKenzie watershed. Entirely remote ELP projects feature enhanced professional development training.  A background in natural history or science communication is useful but not required.

WINTER-SPRING 2021 PROJECTS – Apply Now!

Two terms; Environmental Education Projects: For these projects, you will enroll in ENVS 425: Environmental Education: Theory & Practice (4 credits) during Winter and ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits) during Spring term.

Forests & Fires 2021. This team will work in partnership with the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest to develop and facilitate interdisciplinary curriculum materials that engage middle-schoolers in learning about old-growth forests. Your mission is to show science in action, while fostering the development of personal connections to this amazing ecosystem. Depending on the status of schools in spring, you’ll either be working with middle-schoolers remotely or leading full-day fieldtrips at the Andrews Forest. Lessons will focus on forest dynamics, fire, microclimates. A background in forest biology, fire ecology or ecology is useful but not required.

Restoring Connections 2021. This team will work in partnership with the Mt. Pisgah Arboretum and Adams Elementary School to develop and facilitate curriculum materials that engage students in learning about the amazing ecosystems found right here in the Willamette Valley. Your mission is to show science in action, while fostering the development of personal connections to our home. Depending on the status of schools in spring term, you’ll either be working with students remotely or leading fieldtrips at Mt. Pisgah Arboretum every Thursday. Activities will focus on Coyote Mentoring methods such as journaling, with a focus on native flora, fauna, and natural history. A background in ecology and/or natural history is useful but not required.

Winged Wonders 2021. This team will work in partnership with the Willamette-Laja Twinning Project and Dos Rios Elementary School to develop and facilitate bilingual curriculum materials that engage students in learning about migratory birds. Your mission will be to support their mission of “uniting youth, educators, habitat restoration practitioners and the birding community for deep cultural connections and sustained conservation of our shared migratory species and habitats.” Depending on the status of schools in spring term, you’ll either be working with students remotely or visiting classrooms/school yards at Dos Rios Elementary School. Spanish is highly desired, but not required. Previous experience birding and/or background knowledge in avian biology is also useful but not required.

SPRING 2021 PROJECTS – Apply Now or Later (there will be another call for applications during Winter 2021)

One term; Hybrid Conservation Science in Action Projects with in-person Friday field work: For these projects, you will enroll in ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits) during Spring term.

Promoting Pollinators Team. With the overall goals of providing shade for Goose Creek and habitat for pollinators within the context of an organic farm (Whitewater Ranch), this team will continue maintaining and monitoring a riparian restoration project as well as monitor a new pollinator planting intended to help the farm’s pollinator populations recover from the September 2020 Holiday Farm Fire. This is a continuation of our long-term “Riparian Restoration” project with a greater emphasis on pollinators. You will learn about restoration techniques and challenges, pollinator conservation and a variety of monitoring methods. A background in botany, pollination biology, or ecological restoration is useful but not required.

Hendricks Forest Team 2021. Hendricks Park provides hiking opportunities in shady forests that include large 200-year old trees. The City of Eugene will soon update the park’s 20-year-old management plan and needs current data to inform their efforts. This team will continue recording data such as old-growth tree characteristics, forest health, and invasive species, then make planning recommendations that consider climate change. This year’s protocols will likely include fuels assessment as well. You will learn forest monitoring methods within a planning context. A background in forestry, ecology, botany or GIS is useful but not required.

Fire,  Forests & Fuels Team. While the full scope of this project is yet to be determined, it will involve planning, monitoring and/or recovery related to wildfires. This team may continue mapping oak trees, invasive species and other features to help plan future ecological restoration, recreation and fuel reduction projects in partnership with Willamalane Park and Recreation District (continuing the Oregon Oaks project). Or this team may get involved with conservation areas impacted by the September 2020 Holiday Farm fire. You will learn plant identification and forestry/fire monitoring methods within a restoration and recreation context. A background in forestry, ecology, botany, or GIS is useful but not required.