Skip to Content

Past Course Archive

2020-2021

Summer 2021

ENVS 201 Intro Environmental Studies: Social Science
(4 cr) ( >2) 
Walker
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.Sample Syllabus
ENVS 202: Intro Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) (>3)
Russel
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.Syllabus
ENVS 203: Intro Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) (>1)
Moulton
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.Syllabus
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics
(>1)
Otjen
Imagine yourself in the following situation: you are in a room where you can press a button that says “If you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away”. What ethical reasons would you have to refrain from pressing that button? Is it morally wrong to destroy something we (humans) deem beautiful? Some philosophers believe that there is no moral value without a valuator. So, what if you were the last person on Earth and you would not care about the Grand Canyon, would it still be wrong to press the button? What if you were not the last person, would it suffice to appeal to the idea that you might deprive future generations from experiencing such ineffable scenery? Imagine the button says, “it you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away, but in doing so, you save x human lives.” How many human lives would justify blowing away the Grand Canyon? What if those lives are the lives of some people you will never know/meet with? Does it have to be a human life? What about a non-human animal life? What about an ecosystem?Sample Syllabus

Spring 2021

ENVS 201 Intro Environmental Studies: Social Science
(4 cr) ( >2) 
Martin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.Sample Syllabus
ENVS 203: Humanities
(4 cr) (>1)
Scott
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.Syllabus
ENVS 411 Futurity…Maggiulli
In the contemporary moment of environmental and social crisis, speculating on what the future might bring has become a serious endeavor for scholars, artists, authors, activists, and laypeople.  Questions on everyone’s lips seem to be: How will life on earth respond to these coming changes? Will human social networks fall apart, or will we come together to respond? What kind of future do we even want, let alone believe is possible? Still other groups resist this renewed obsession with futurity and embrace alternate perceptions of time.  
This course will explore different relationships with time as expressed through science fiction, film, policy planning, artistic expression, popular science writing, and speculative endeavors that cannot be easily categorized (e.g. a speculative evolution bestiary). Specific cases we will engage include how conservation policy plans for a climate changed future; what consequences post-apocalyptic utopian narratives have for action on environmental issues; how spiraling temporalities, rather than linear, are depicted in indigenous science fiction; and how the Anthropocene epoch brought geologic time into the popular vernacular. We will address these different ideas and ideals about what the future might bring and consider what values are built into these future visions. Some questions we will consider are: Whose future is being depicted? What voices are included, and which are left out? How do different conceptions of time factor into these alternative visions? How does the form or genre of the media affect its representation? And, ultimately, how do we plan for a future that will take the things we learn in this class into account? The course aims to be generative for students from all disciplines, as concepts of futurity are evident in everything from environmental policy to sociology and the arts.
ENVS 411 Plant to Pharmacy…White
From herbal lay medicine to historical botanical exploration to the
development of patented anti-cancer drugs, plant medicines have
profoundly impacted the health and well-being of human societies and their environments. This course will offer students the opportunity to
synthesize broad social and environmental concepts, from across the
sciences and humanities, through the lens of plant medicine. We will
begin by exploring basic plant physiology and ecology, move through the personal and community-based practices of plant medicine into global, commercialized systems of medicine and drug development, and return to the post-consumption, environmental residues of plant medicine
chemicals. We will discuss these issues along a spectrum of “medicines”
from foods to toxins, by examining case studies of plants such as apple,
coffee, garlic, ginseng, echinacea, Oregon grape, willow, opium poppy,
mayapple and yew. Readings and discussions will be augmented by hands-on plant medicine making, guest lectures and two local field trips.
ENVS 429L Environ LeadershipLynchBoulay
Partnering with governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, public schools and local businesses, students develop service learning projects.
ENVS 450 Political Ecology
(4 cr)
Walker
Examines how social relations and economic, social, and cultural control of natural resources shape human interactions with the environment. Theory and case studies.
ENVS 493M Passive Cooling
(4 cr)
Rempel
Conceptual and quantitative investigations of passive cooling design and performance, including precedents, shading, natural ventilation, evaporative cooling, use of thermal mass, radiant cooling assisted by cold night skies, and control scheduling, supported by field investigations and introductory energy modeling.

Winter 2021

ENVS 201 Intro Environmental Studies: Social Science
(4 cr) ( >2) 
 Walker
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.Sample Syllabus
ENVS 202: Natural Science
(4 cr) (>3)
Rempel
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.Syllabus
ENVS 335 Allocation of Scarce Environmental Resources (4 cr) (>2)Cameron
Earth does not have enough resources to permit humans to have as much of everything as they might want. We are the dominant species; other species currently have standing only insofar as humans care about them. In this capacity, we must often make difficult choices about how the earth’s environmental and natural resources are managed. For example, forests can be preserved in their natural state, harvested selectively and sustainably, clear-cut, or turned into farms, housing developments or shopping malls. Lax pollution regulations can permit industry to prosper, allowing higher wages, lower consumer prices and bigger investment returns for people who are saving for their retirements, or pollution can be tightly controlled to improve human health outcomes and protect ecological systems and their services.Different constituencies have different levels of desire for each of the range of possible management outcomes. The benefits or costs to individual humans under different management scenarios may be modest but widespread, or they may be large and concentrated among fewer people. The benefits may also accrue to very different groups of people than those who bear the costs. There are often benfits and costs from the way resources are managed that spill over onto third parties- who are not directly involved in the decisions that have been made and who therefore do not have any weight given to their preferences in these choices. Likewise, many resources belong to everyone but no one, and sustainable management is often fundamentally impossible without government intervention in the form of policies and regulations.
We will explore how environmental and natural resource management decisions are made. Given that we need to use at least some natural resources to survive, it is not possible to completely eliminate all mining, fishing, or logging. Likewise, it is not possible to reduce all forms of pollution to zero. But how much of these activities is too much? We will examine some pragmatic criteria and some evidence which can be used to help guide decision-makers who are responsible for setting policies and regulations. We will pay particular attention to circumstances when government intervention is essential because private incentives definitely cannot be relied upon to yield socially desirable outcomes.
Syllabus
ENVS 410 Unnatural Disasters
(4 cr)
Scott
ENVS 410 Water, Public Health, and EnvironmentRussel
Water, public health and the environment will examine the provision of water and sanitation services around the world with a particular focus on cases studies from low and middle income countries in Africa and South East Asia. This course will examine: The current crisis of access to water, sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) services and infrastructure around the world, the public health and environmental impacts of insufficient WASH services, technology, planning and policy options for expanding WASH services, the economic and behavioral barriers to the adoption of WASH technologies and services and the human right to WASH and its impacts on market-based approaches to service delivery.
ENVS 411 Climate Change ConflictRenirie
This course analyzes global climate change as a multi-dimensional conflict and explores potential areas of intervention for resolution and transformation. As a distinctly global phenomenon, individuals come to understand climate change through unique social, cultural, and political lenses that often hinder effective communication across difference. Recognizing that much of the public discourse about climate change is dominated by polarizing and adversarial debates, this course aims to expand the ‘toolkit’ environmental professionals can use to resolve conflicts through non-adversarial methods. While acknowledging the systemic nature of climate change, particular emphasis will be given to the malleable social systems that drive it.
Core assignments and exercises for the course are designed to foster both analytical skills and practical techniques in conflict resolution. Through a series of case studies, we will frame contemporary climate change discourse as sites of personal, interpersonal, and societal conflict. We will ask questions about who defines the problem, what impacts are deemed important, what timescale is utilized, what solutions are considered worthwhile, and how identity shapes personal environmental attitudes. Using frameworks for conflict analysis, students will complete a ‘conflict assessment’ paper throughout the term that analyzes a particular area of climate conflict using scholarly literature, primary sources, and their own lived experiences. In-class exercises and reflective writing assignments will help students reflect on their learned beliefs and develop communication skills necessary to collaborate across diverse worldviews.
ENVS 435 Environmental JusticeNorgaard
In this class we will consider how environmental conditions produce and are in-turn shaped by social inequality. The course is interdisciplinary with a focus on the environmental social sciences (sociology, geography, political science, law) and on the environmental humanities (philosophy, literature, history). Students will learn the basic history of, and theories / methods applied to Environmental Justice.
ENVS 455 Sustainability
(4 cr)
Walker
In the last few decades we have heard the word “sustainability” used more and more frequently, but what does it mean? Some cynics would say, with some validity, that sustainability has become a buzzword—often with little or no clear meaning. Yet, with the world facing the greatest environmental crises (climate change, mass extinctions, etc.) that modern humans have ever known, we cannot afford cynicism. The concept of sustainability has a rich history and potentially great conceptual power. As a roadmap to the future, it is more important than ever that we utilize the power of sustainability to its fullest potential. As we work hard in practical ways to ensure a sustainable future, we will need to be hard-headed and rigorous in how we apply the ideas of sustainability. Fortunately, the concept of sustainability has been discussed and developed by scholars and scientists for generations. Unfortunately, many of our actions do not take advantage of that reservoir of knowledge. This course seeks to bring to the attention of a new generation of students the valuable conceptual tools of sustainability that are often neglected—tools that we need more today than ever.
As the dominant concept shaping our environmental actions today, it is essential that sustainability not be allowed to slip into intellectual muddiness, since, by any reasonable definition, the world is today becoming less sustainable. It may be said without exaggeration that how we think about sustainability today may shape the future of the planet.
ENVS Wetland Ecological Management
(4 cr) (>2)[GP][IC] 
Bridgham
This is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate course that examines management and policy issues relating to wetlands, while providing enough scientific background to understand these issues. The course is divided into three parts (see syllabus). The first section includes an overview of cultural perceptions of wetlands and how these have changed through time, a general description of different types of wetlands, and then a more in-depth discussion of jurisdictional wetland definitions, classification schemes, wetland distributions globally and in the U.S., and current and historical wetland loss rates. The middle section is an introduction to wetland ecology and includes factors controlling their formation and development over time on the landscape, an introduction to hydrology as it pertains to wetlands, hydric soils, and plant community ecology. It focuses on the three main criteria for most definitions of wetlands: hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation. The last part of the course returns in more depth to the management and policy issues that were introduced in the beginning of the term. We will discuss wetland laws and policy in Oregon, the U.S., and globally, mapping and delineation of wetlands, and wetland restoration and creation.
In a single quarter, we cannot cover all aspects of wetland ecology and/or wetland management. The emphasis of this course is on management and policy issues relating to wetlands, with hopefully enough science provided to properly evaluate these more applied concerns.
Syllabus
ENVS 467 Sustainable Agriculture
(4 cr)
Martin
Examines sustainability issues in agricultural production and current food systems. Focuses on environmental aspects of seed, water, soil, energy, and pest management.Syllabus
ENVS 494M Passive Heating
(4 cr)
Rempel
Conceptual and quantitative investigations of passive solar heating design and performance, including precedents, solar resource evaluation, glazing selection and orientation, thermal mass materials and positioning, movable insulation, and control scheduling, supported by solar site surveys and modeling in EnergyPlus.

Fall 2020

ENVS 202 Intro Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) ( >3) 
 Russel
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.Sample Syllabus
ENVS 203: Humanities
(4 cr)
LeMenager
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.Sample Syllabus
ENVS 225 Intro to Food Studies
(4 cr) (>2)[GP][IC] 
Martin
An exploration of the field of “food studies” and examination of the role of food in historical and contemporary life in the US and around the world.Sample Syllabus
ENVS 410 Data Management
(4 cr)
Hallett
This course covers the non-statistical aspects of the data life cycle, including how to store, clean, visualize and communicate data. It is intended as a complement to statistics courses – we will cover how to get your data into shape for analysis, and how to communicate your findings visually. It is primarily a methods class and will be taught in R (but there is no expectation that students know R coming in).
ENVS 410 Outdoor School for All Lynch
In this class, we will examine Oregon’s Outdoor School for All program – looking at the history, implementation, and outcomes of this statewide initiative on academic success and environmental literacy. We will use a JEDI lens (justice, equity, diversity and inclusion) to examine the efforts of providers and facilities to live up to the goal of “for all.”  Students will hear from an array of guest speakers from across the state who will share their experiences with Outdoor School.
ENVS 410 Wolves: Ecology & PolicyBoulay
Wolves present a complex, thorny environmental issue that can provide insights into the interplay of ecology, sociology and policy. Variously portrayed as bloodthirsty killers, powerful leaders, unrestrained loners or symbols of dwindling wildness, wolves evoke strong emotions. Wolves also influence prey behavior and populations with effects that ripple through ecosystems. In this remote course, we will use wolf conservation as a timely case study to explore tensions such as the dynamics between state and federal policies, urban and rural economies and values, and ecological and social concerns. We will learn about wolf biology and management, then interview stakeholders such as environmentalists, policy makers, biologists, ranchers and others. While this course is interdisciplinary, it will prioritize a natural science perspective so will meet the Area 3A Life Science/3A Natural Science requirement for ESCI/ENVS majors.
ENVS 411 Gender and Climate Justice Moulton
This course engages with human geography, advances in glaciology, and feminist science and technology studies to explore gender and climate justice in glaciated regions. Students will engage with both gender identity and feminist theory as a structuring principle for re-thinking how climate change knowledge is produced and valued.  We will use the framework of climate justice—which demands that we consider multi-faceted questions of power and inequity to understand the unequal distribution of climate change burdens and benefits— to explore three case studies in icy regions: the Andes, the Arctic, and the Pacific Northwest.
ENVS 411 EcomusicologyHilgren
In this course we’ll examine the many intersections between sound, music, and environmental justice. We’ll begin by exploring our engagements with the Eugene soundscape – these experiences will serve as launching points for a survey of contemporary ecomusicological research. Through engagement with readings and music, sound art, films, and other media, we will explore the interactions and overlaps between sound/music and such topics as creative environmental activism, ecofeminism, multispecies justice, Indigenous studies and decolonization, critical race theory, and science and technology studies. Throughout the course we’ll consider the contributions of sound/musical arts, creative exploration and critique, and arts and humanities scholarship to other areas of environmental inquiry.

2019-2020

Summer 2020

ENVS 411: Food Access and Shortage 

Instructor: Dan Shtob

Topics Include:
-International approaches to food and water security and access.
-Food security versus food sovereignty: food as a human right.
-Factors that influence access to food and water: environmental, cultural, economic, and political.
-Why do people experience food and water shortages and famines when we can produce enough food?

ENVS 411: Water as Power, Life and Death 

Instructor: Lisa Fink

ENVS 411 Water as Power, Life, and Death is an online interdisciplinary course that will explore water issues (e.g. water quality, water scarcity, energy and water, privatization, food and water, climate change and water, etc.) using a Critical Environmental Justice (CEJ) framework. Following the four pillars of CEJ as outlined in David Naguib Pellow’s 2018 book What Is Critical Environmental Justice?, this course will include 1) analysis that attends to multiple intersecting categories of identity, such as race, ethnicity, indigeneity, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, citizenship, ability, and species, 2) analysis that brings multiple spatial and temporal scales together, giving special attention to the body, 3) interrogation of the role of the state in water issues, and 4) recognition of the indispensability of all human and more-than-human actors. This water studies course will also explore your local watersheds and their major features, reflecting on how water acts as an agent that affects the lived experience of communities. It will include a final digital project to encourage different kinds of engagement and thinking about contemporary water issues. Contact Lisa Fink at lfink@uoregon.edu for more information.

Spring 2020

ENVS 411: Multispecies Studies & The Anthropocene

Instructor: Nate Otjen

Life during the Anthropocene presents a number of challenges for humankind and other species. Perhaps the greatest challenge during this unsettling moment of human-induced change is learning to live with more-than-human others who are also suffering from climate change, extinction, urbanization, pollution, and industrial activity. Unable to adapt fast enough to the profound environmental changes of the past few centuries, many species are threatened and going extinct. At the same time, domesticated and non-native organisms have been flourishing in the wake of human activity. As these examples indicate, the Anthropocene — perhaps more than any other moment during humanity’s brief history — reveals the various ways that humans are tethered to the lives of others. If humankind hopes to survive this difficult moment, we must learn to live together with other plants, animals, fungi, microbes, and even physical matter. With its interest in how a multitude of creatures are connected to human lives and cultures, the emerging interdisciplinary field of multispecies studies offers a promising way to explore, and act upon, people’s relationships with the beings and things of the world.

This class charts the development of multispecies studies throughout the past few decades and considers how the various modes of togetherness posed by the field can help us all survive and resist anthropogenic disruption. To do this work, we will examine four broad themes taken up by multispecies practitioners: the animal, the plant, the material, and the human. Taken together, these four subjects offer points of departure for exploring the configurations that currently characterize the field. We will think about how animals, plants, and material things impact people, and we will work to deconstruct the very idea of the human. The ideas gathered from the readings and class discussions will inform a final project that explores an animal, plant, or material that impacts your life in some substantial way.

ENVS 411: Land Use / Biodiversity 

Instructor: Geoffrey Johnson

Much of the biodiversity in the world today is understood to be the result not of land and life without human influence, but of coevolution with human impacts integral to maintaining ecosystem function. This course explores human relations to the environment in a changing world and applies the historical context of past land-use to current conservation issues. With a central focus on indigenous land-use course content will span native studies, environmental history, conservation science, disturbance ecology, archeology and paleoecology, and as such we will emphasize an interdisciplinary approach. Despite recognition of the importance of human impact in generating biodiversity, much of the existing work in these fields conforms to the settler-colonial tradition of subsuming indigenous ways of knowing. Thus, while examining texts and materials from subdisciplines, we will apply a decolonial lens to understanding the ecological relationship of indigenous peoples to land around the world and throughout time. The course will begin by briefly exploring concepts of biodiversity, identifying settler-colonial narratives of land (ie wilderness), and configuring a lexicon of decolonial critique. In conjunction, we will survey selected accounts of indigenous relations to the environment and the settler-colonial context for erasing the use of land by indigenous peoples. Next, we will discuss conservation science, its goals and methods, its relationship to history, and the ongoing issues surrounding access to land and protection of biodiversity. Finally, to prepare for an individual research project, we will examine various prehistoric epistemologies and diverse lines of evidence to understand conservation issues as long-term socio-ecological outcomes. Projects will form the core of this course and students can expect time in class and out of class developing comprehensive case studies of conservation in light of prehistory.

Winter 2020

ENVS 411: Global Political Economy of Climate Change

Instructor: Hugo Seguin

The fight against climate change is shaping politics, economies, innovation, and the flows of capital and ideas. What are these transformations based on? Where do they lead? How can we speed up change towards a more sustainable future? This ENVS 411 interdisciplinary capstone course will explore these new dynamics, as well as the rapid technological, energy, financial, political, social and ideological changes and conflicts in the country and around the world. This course posits a world in transition, working to avoid climate catastrophe. It sees deliberate actions at all levels of governance (individuals, local, state and national governments, businesses and groups from civil society, international) that, if still way insufficient, are impacting national and global political economies. It also sees political and economic actors pushing back, as well as structural and ideological constraints to change.

The course will foreground primary literature (government, scientific, business and NGO reports; treaties, laws and regulations). It will punctuate lectures with guest speakers from the field. The course also postulates pressures on energy systems, as well as the emergence of accompanying upstream and downstream technologies as one of the main indicators of change in the global and national political economy. It also conceives of climate change as a market failure, and thus foregrounds the roles of markets and the State in addressing climate change, using documents and readings from distinct perspectives.

Fall 2019

ENVS 411: Ecohorror-Ecocide: The Environmentalist Rhetoric of Fear

Instructor: Katrina Maggiulli

Visual renditions present an apocalyptic future New York City that has been flooded by the effects of climate change; playful “creature features” introduce Pacific Northwest youth to the threats of non-native species invasions; Mother Nature fights back in a film where plants release toxins to kill off the human species. While not always identified as such, ecohorror narratives are a familiar rhetorical structure in contemporary popular culture as well as in popular science writing and scientific outreach publications. The generic structures of the horror genre are harnessed to frame revenge of nature narratives and to garner attention for the immediacy of environmental problems. But are these threats of apocalypse doing what we hope? Do they instigate productive change in the social understanding of the environment or are they doing more harm than good?

While constructed with the best of intentions, these narratives often represent troubling conceptions of the “natural” that widen the separation between humans and their environment (or other species) and reinforce problematic conceptions of race, gender, ability, and sexuality. This course will take a cultural studies approach to identifying where, and how, the genre of ecohorror appears by exploring a broad set of contemporary U.S. cultural artifacts ranging from blockbuster movies to comics and climate activism videos. We will be particularly attentive to horror’s role in science communication by analyzing texts such as USFWS outreach publications, documentaries, news articles, and popular science writing. We will consider what horror’s generic tropes do for a broader cultural imaginary of environmental degradation and explore potentially productive applications of these tropes. This course should be a generative space for not only students in the environmental humanities and those interested in the social life of science but also for environmental science students who must consider communicating their work to the public.

ENVS 411: Species in Conflict

Instructor: Kirsten Vinyeta

This course explores the ways in which humans and non-humans shape each other’s lives. Non-human animal and plant species form part of every aspect of our daily existence, whether we recognize it or not. In some cases, another species can be critical to our survival. Certain species may come to define our identity either as individuals or as part of larger social groups. Because of their crucial role in human lives, non-human species can also lead to, or embody, social conflict between human groups. All the while, we too shape the lives of other species with our interactions.

In this course, we will examine interdependence and conflict between species by engaging a variety of interdisciplinary and multi-cultural readings. A significant portion of the course will be dedicated to exploring this topic in relation to five species of significance in Oregon: spotted owl, cannabis, turf grass, salmon, and matsutake. These case studies will illustrate how human/non-human relations come to embody issues of class, race, aesthetics, indigeneity and settler colonialism, globalization, and government policy. The cases will also illustrate how these interspecies relationships impact the environment as well as the lives of the other species in question. Students will have a chance to explore this topic in relation to one or two species of personal interest through both a creative project and an academic paper.

2018-2019

Spring 2019

ENVS 201 Intro Environmental Studies: Social Science (4 cr) ( >2) SyllabusSchreiner
Our course will explore how social structures and
ecological processes intertwine and interact to
produce the world, although with differential
experiences and unequal impacts for people and
places. We will consider how critical social science
approaches engage in such inquiry. Our primary
learning goal will be the development of a critical
“socio-ecological imagination,” or the awareness of
the interrelationship between embodied personal
experience and the wider social and ecological
systems in which we are embedded, and of the power
dynamics that shape these relationships. Important
“eco-social structures” of power that we will examine
include the social metabolic order of capitalism,
settler colonialism, and racial capitalism. A key
thematic focus of our course will be analysis of the
global agrifood system and its various impacts, and
you will have opportunity to connect our analysis to
local food systems through participation in a service
learning project at a FOOD for Land County
community garden. Your learning for the term will
culminate in the development of an online profile of a
key issue from our course that you find most
significant, thereby allowing you to contribute to
social scientific inquiry and research. We will take the
cultivation of a critical socio-ecological imagination
very seriously – but have fun along the way! – and this
means we will need to think critically and creatively
about the perspectives, data, and analyses we
encounter; reflect honestly and thoughtfully on our
own assumptions, views, and experiences; and
interact together with respect and a shared aim for
learning.
ENVS 203 Intro Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr.) (>1) SyllabusLeMenager
In this course we will learn about what the Humanities are, as an interdisciplinary field, and how Humanities methods and research contribute to environmental thought and action. The class involves reading and research but also creativity and innovation. It is a lab in which we will think together about the possible futures of our stressed planet and how to harness imagination in the service of a livable world.
ENVS 410/510: Justice, Capitalism, and the Anthropocene
Spring 2019 (4 cr) Syllabus
Muraca
Geologists are about to name the age in which we live according to its main geological driving factor: human influence – the Anthropocene. This is at the same time a contested and powerful term. Who is meant by the ‘anthropos’, the human, responsible of the devastating ecological crisis we are facing? According to indigenous scholar Kyle Whyte the Anthropocene is intensified colonialism. For others, Capitalism and its specific relation to Nature should be at the core of the Anthropocene narrative. In this course we will discuss the different perspectives on the Anthropocene and analyze the modes of intensified colonization that started before the industrial revolution, but significantly increased in the last 5 decades, and their implications in terms of global justice. We will critically examine the specificity of a colonization that does not only extend to territories, communities, and natural resources, but also to the way in which people think, dream, shape their lives, and relate to other human and nonhuman others. We will also explore alternatives, breaking points, as well as forms of resistance and subversion.
ENVS 411: The Species Problem (4 cr)  SyllabusMaggiulli
Since the publication of Charles Darwin’s On The Origin of
Species in 1859, it is scientifically accepted that species are fluid ever-changing things but, despite this dynamic view, they are often still treated as fixed categories to be preserved in their
current state. This course explores “species” as a concept and the role the category plays in conservation and in the popular
imaginary. We will take an ethically critical lens to conservation issues to ask questions such as: What is at stake when we represent non-native species as aggressive invaders? How does policy aimed at protecting threatened species disable innovative conservation tactics? How do you decide when lethal control is acceptable? Should de-extinction and rewilding projects be considered as conservation strategies? We will use USFWS outreach publications, environmental education materials, Environmental Impact Statements, contemporary news articles, and more as our archive of materials in this course. Participation in this course includes a field trip and in-class meetings with local land management organizations. Students will be required to participate in one Saturday half-day field trip.
ENVS 455/555 Sustainability (4 cr) SyllabusWalker
In the last few decades we have heard the word “sustainability” used more and more frequently, but what does it mean? Some cynics would say, with some validity, that sustainability has become a buzzword—often with little or no clear meaning. Yet, with the world facing the greatest environmental crises (climate change, mass extinctions, etc.) that modern humans have ever known, we cannot afford cynicism. The concept of sustainability has a rich history and potentially great conceptual power. As a roadmap to the future, it is more important than ever that we utilize the power of sustainability to its fullest potential. As we work hard in practical ways to ensure a sustainable future, we will need to be hard-headed and rigorous in how we apply the ideas of sustainability. Fortunately, the concept of sustainability has been discussed and developed by scholars and scientists for generations. Unfortunately, many of our actions do not take advantage of that reservoir of knowledge. This course seeks to bring to the attention of a new generation of students the valuable conceptual tools of sustainability that are often neglected—tools that we need more today than ever.
As the dominant concept shaping our environmental actions today, it is essential that sustainability not be allowed to slip into intellectual muddiness, since, by any reasonable definition, the world is today becoming less sustainable. It may be said without exaggeration that how we think about sustainability today may shape the future of the planet.
ENVS 493: Passive Cooling (4 cr) SyllabusRempel
Air conditioning in America has risen from a luxury to a perceived necessity in the past fifty years. Non‐residential
buildings that once relied on awnings, shades, and operable windows for cooling have been retrofitted to the
extent that three‐quarters of those built before 1964 now have mechanical cooling; in 2013, only 9% of new
homes were built without air conditioning. As a result, space cooling in the U.S. now consumes an estimated 6
quadrillion Btu of energy each year, at a cost of $62 billion, and emits over 340 million metric tons of CO2. At the
same time, the pressure to design buildings with smaller carbon footprints is rising, promoting new interest in
passive cooling designs. Diverse strategies, including shading, cross ventilation, stack ventilation, wind catchers,
passive cool towers, night‐flush cooling of thermal mass, green roofs, earth tubes, and courtyards have now been
well‐studied in numerous climates. In this course, students will gain the tools and experiences to estimate the
passive cooling performance of each strategy under specific climatic conditions through field, laboratory, and
computational exercises. This course has a service learning component: small‐group term projects will develop
passive cooling strategies for projects of interest to a community partner, including existing or planned buildings,
incorporating spatial, experiential, and quantitative components. One field trip to an off‐site location may be
required.

Winter 2019

ENVS 201 Intro Environmental Studies: Social Science (4 cr) ( >2) SyllabusWalker
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 202 Intro Environmental Studies: Natural ScienceHallett
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 335 Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources SyllabusCameron
Earth does not have enough resources to permit humans to have as much of everything as they might want. We are the dominant species; other species currently have standing only insofar as humans care about them. In this capacity, we must often make difficult choices about how the earth’s environmental and natural resources are managed. For example, forests can be preserved in their natural state, harvested selectively and sustainably, clear-cut, or turned into farms, housing developments or shopping malls. Lax pollution regulations can permit industry to prosper, allowing higher wages, lower consumer prices and bigger investment returns for people who are saving for their retirements, or pollution can be tightly controlled to improve human health outcomes and protect ecological systems and their services.Different constituencies have different levels of desire for each of the range of possible management outcomes. The benefits or costs to individual humans under different management scenarios may be modest but widespread, or they may be large and concentrated among fewer people. The benefits may also accrue to very different groups of people than those who bear the costs. There are often benfits and costs from the way resources are managed that spill over onto third parties- who are not directly involved in the decisions that have been made and who therefore do not have any weight given to their preferences in these choices. Likewise, many resources belong to everyone but no one, and sustainable management is often fundamentally impossible without government intervention in the form of policies and regulations.We will explore how environmental and natural resource management decisions are made. Given that we need to use at least some natural resources to survive, it is not possible to completely eliminate all mining, fishing, or logging. Likewise, it is not possible to reduce all forms of pollution to zero. But how much of these activities is too much? We will examine some pragmatic criteria and some evidence which can be used to help guide decision-makers who are responsible for setting policies and regulations. We will pay particular attention to circumstances when government intervention is essential because private incentives definitely cannot be relied upon to yield socially desirable outcomes.
ENVS 410 Forest Ecology and Management (4 cr) Dickman
This course provides an overview of forest ecology, emphasizing forests of the Pacific Northwest, and also includes discussions of past and current laws and policies affecting management of forests on public lands in this region. In addition to learning important concepts, we will discuss current issues, we’ll get out in the forest to see firsthand
examples of some local management and stewardship projects, and we will examine complex questions. You will be required to read, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate.Saturday Field Trips Required: Tentative Dates 1/12, 1/26, 2/9, 2/23, 3/9
ENVS 410 Water, Public Health and EnvironmentRussel
Water, public health and the environment will examine the provision of water and sanitation services around the world with a particular focus on cases studies from low and middle income countries in Africa and South East Asia. This course will examine: The current crisis of access to water, sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) services and infrastructure around the world, the public health and environmental impacts of insufficient WASH services, technology, planning and policy options for expanding WASH services, the economic and behavioral barriers to the adoption of WASH technologies and services and the human right to WASH and its impacts on market-based approaches to service delivery.
ENVS 411 Topic: Living in the AnthropoceneFink
ENVS 411 Living in the Anthropocene explores what has come to be called the Anthropocene, a geological era defined by radioactive elements dispersed across the planet by nuclear bomb tests and an epoch marked by plastic pollution and anthropogenic climate destabilization. Through critical engagement with a problem on which people across this university and the globe are working, we will consider how living in the Anthropocene demands that we think about ourselves not only as individuals, but also as members of a planetary population and as a geological force that determines the physical conditions around us on a global scale. We will investigate the contested designation of the Anthropocene and the implications embedded within it. Further, we will analyze this proposed epoch through the lens of race, gender, settler colonialism, and white supremacy. The course includes readings on racial ecologies, climate change, and the future of the planet that will encourage us to think with critical self-awareness about our roles as students, scholars, and human beings experiencing, thinking, and writing about our changing world.
ENVS 411 Topic: Environmental Law, Protection, and JusticeShtob
How and why do environmental laws and regulations succeed or fail in promoting environmental protection and justice? When can the application of environmental laws lead to unintended or unwanted consequences? Can fundamental legal assumptions create and perpetuate injustice? If so, can this be avoided? In this course, we will examine legal theory and practice using several case studies in human and non-human environmental protection and justice. We will begin with a brief survey of environmental law and justice issues, including how they intersect. We will then examine contributory factors such how laws are developed; how they are used in practice by activists, legal professionals and other interests; how regulatory approaches reflect environmental, social, economic and other priorities; and how the guiding philosophies of environmental laws are reflected in legal practice. While this course is intended to be useful for students considering careers in environmental law or policy, a background in these topics is not required to be successful.
ENVS 435 Environmental JusticeNorgaard
Environmental justice and its impact on current decisions. Focus on civil rights law, perception of risk, and relation of sustainability and equity.
ENVS 450 Political EcologyWalker
Examines how social relations and economic, social, and cultural control of natural resources shape human interactions with the environment. Theory and case studies.
ENVS 467 Sustainable AgricultureMartin
Examines sustainability issues in agricultural production and current food systems. Focuses on environmental aspects of seed, water, soil, energy, and pest management.
ENVS 494M Passive HeatingRempel
Conceptual and quantitative investigations of passive solar heating design and performance, including precedents, solar resource evaluation, glazing selection and orientation, thermal mass materials and positioning, movable insulation, and control scheduling, supported by solar site surveys and modeling in EnergyPlus.

Fall 2018

ENVS 202 Intro Environmental Studies: Natural Science (4 cr) ( >3) Click here for Course SyllabusBothun
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 203 Intro Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) (>1) Click here for Course SyllabusWald
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. (The course must be taken for a grade in order to satisfy ENVS/ESCI major requirements.)
ENVS 225 Intro Food Studies (>2) (>IC) Click here for Course SyllabusMartin
An exploration of the field of “food studies” and examination of the role of food in historical and contemporary life in the US and around the world.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (>1) Click here for Course SyllabusGuernsey
Imagine yourself in the following situation: you are in a room where you can press a button that says “If you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away”. What ethical reasons would you have to refrain from pressing that button? Is it morally wrong to destroy something we (humans) deem beautiful? Some philosophers believe that there is no moral value without a valuator. So, what if you were the last person on Earth and you would not care about the Grand Canyon, would it still be wrong to press the button? What if you were not the last person, would it suffice to appeal to the idea that you might deprive future generations from experiencing such ineffable scenery? Imagine the button says, “it you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away, but in doing so, you save x human lives.” How many human lives would justify blowing away the Grand Canyon? What if those lives are the lives of some people you will never know/meet with? Does it have to be a human life? What about a non-human animal life? What about an ecosystem?
ENVS 410/510 Climate-Responsive Design Click here for Course Syllabus Rempel
How did people design their shelters for thermal comfort, and even thermal delight, before fossil fuels made mechanical heating and cooling possible? This course explores the world’s diversity of climates and biomess, focusing on indigenous building practices developed over centuries of experimentation and innovation. These structures are formed by necessity of local wood, stone, skins, leaves, and earth. They are also often assembled to connect human communities with minimal need for transportation, and they have met great pressures to minimize energy use for providing warmth and coolness. As such, they form the great majority of the world’s truly sustainable buildings, and they offer fascinating lessons for contemporary green design. The goals of this course are to reveal these lessons, to evaluate existing green buildings in light of them, and ultimately to apply them in the redesign of existing projects. This is a seminar course taught through class discussion and field investigation. Discoveries, insights, and experimentation will be synthesized through weekly assignments and a term project.
ENVS 411 Wolves in Oregon Click here for Course SyllabusBoulay
Wolves present a complex, thorny environmental issue that can provide insights into the interplay of ecology, sociology and policy. Variously portrayed as bloodthirsty killers, powerful leaders, unrestrained loners or symbols of dwindling wildness, wolves evoke strong emotions. Through this 4-credit course, we will use wolf conservation as a timely case study to explore tensions such as the dynamics between state and federal policies, urban and rural economies and values, and ecological and social concerns. Over the summer, students will conduct background reading and research, identify stakeholder perspectives and create potential interview questions. During Week 0, we will take an 8-day camping trip to northeastern Oregon, meeting with people—environmentalists, policy makers, biologists, ranchers and others—along the way. Stakeholder interviews will be interspersed with field tours and handson activities. Back on campus, students will participate in a weekly class and group project to reflect upon and integrate what they heard, observed, and considered during the field trip.
ENVS 411 Design of Disaster Click Here for Course SyllabusShtob
This class will explore how natural disaster, including the risk of future disaster, is experienced throughout the world, with a particular emphasis on how human systems and decisions made about our built environment “design the disasters of the future.”
ENVS 477 Soil Science  Click Here for Course SyllabusSilva
In this class we will consider how environmental conditions produce and are in-turn shaped by social inequality. The course is interdisciplinary with a focus on the environmental social sciences (sociology, geography, political science, law) and on the environmental humanities (philosophy, literature, history). Students will learn the basic history of, and theories / methods applied to Environmental Justice.

2017-2018

Spring 2018

ENVS 202 Intro Environmental Studies: Natural Science (4 cr.) (>3) SyllabusRempel
Contributions of the natural sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include biological processes, ecological principles, chemical cycling, ecosystem characteristics, and natural system vulnerability and recovery.
ENVS 203 Intro Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr.) (>1) SyllabusWald
Contributions of the humanities and arts to understandings of the environment. Emphasis on diverse ways of thinking, writing, creating, and engaging in environmental discourse.
ENVS 410 Water, Public Health, Environment (4 cr) (3B Sustainable Design & Practice Core) SyllabusRussel
Water, public health and the environment will examine the provision of water and sanitation services around the world with a
particular focus on cases studies from low and middle income countries in Africa and South East Asia. This course will examine:
– The current crisis of access to water and sanitation (W&S)
services and infrastructure around the world.
– The public health and environmental impacts of insufficient
W&S services.
– Technology, planning and policy options for expanding W&S
services.
– The economic and behavioral barriers to the adoption of W&S
technologies and services.
– The human right to W&S and its impacts on market-based
approaches to service delivery.
ENVS 410 Diversity Initiatives in Public Lands (4 cr.) (3B Humanities Core) SyllabusWald
This course examines the racial equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) efforts of federal land agencies such as the National Park Service and United States Forest Service, mainstream conservation organizations such as The Sierra Club and The Wilderness Society, outdoor recreation-oriented companies like REI and Patagonia, and newer grassroots organizations like Outdoor Afro and Latino Outdoors. It aims to prepare students to engage more thoughtfully with the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion efforts they are likely to encounter in the agencies and advocacy organizations with which they may work. Students should leave the course with increased understanding of the equity and social justice issues that exist in public lands management and public lands advocacy organizations as well as knowledge of some of the ways agencies and organizations are attempting to address these issues.Moreover, students will explore what equitable engagement with public lands might look like. We will ask, what would it look like for agencies to manage public lands for environmental justice? As a core part of this course, students will have the opportunity to work directly with a community organization in the early stages of its own equity process. This work with a community partner will expose students to the messy intersections of theory and praxis.
ENVS 411: Top H2O: Life & Death (4 cr.) (Area 4) SyllabusFink
Water as Power, Life, and Death is an interdisciplinary course that will explore water issues using a Critical Environmental Justice (CEJ) framework. Following the four pillars of CEJ as outlined in David Naguib Pellow’s 2018 book What Is Critical Environmental Justice?, the course will include 1) analysis that is attentive to multiple intersecting categories of identity, such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, citizenship, ability, and species, 2) analysis that brings multiple spatial and temporal scales together with attention to the body, 3) interrogation of the role of the state in water issues, and 4) recognition of the indispensability of all human and more-than-human actors. In exploring our local watershed and its major features, this water studies course will consider how water is an agent that affects the lived experience of communities. It will include field trips, visiting scholars and activists, a Community Classroom Connection component, and a final video project to encourage different kinds of engagement and thinking about contemporary water issues. Contact Lisa Fink at lfink@uoregon.edu or click on the e-mail icon above for more information.
ENVS 411: Decolonizing Environmental Justice (4 cr.) (Area 4) SyllabusBacon
In depth examination of a particular environmental topic such as global warming, ecosystem restoration, energy alternatives, geothermal development, public lands management, or environmental literature. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
ENVS 429: Environmental Leadership (4 cr.) (Area 5) SyllabusBoulay/Lynch
Partnering with governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, public schools and local businesses, students develop service learning projects. Repeatable when topic changes.
ENVS 450: Political Ecology (4 cr.) (3B Social Science Core) SyllabusWalker
Examines how social relations and economic, social, and cultural control of natural resources shape human interactions with the environment. Theory and case studies.
ENVS 467: Sustainable Agriculuture (4 cr.) (3B Sustainable Design & Practice Core) SyllabusMartin
Examines sustainability issues in agricultural production and current food systems. Focuses on environmental aspects of seed, water, soil, energy, and pest management.

Winter 2018

ENVS 201 Intro Environmental Studies: Social Science (4 cr) ( >2) SyllabusWalker
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen & the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 202 Intro Environmental Studies: Natural Science SyllabusRussel
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 335 Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources SyllabusCameron
Earth does not have enough resources to permit humans to have as much of everything as they might want. We are the dominant species; other species currently have standing only insofar as humans care about them. In this capacity, we must often make difficult choices about how the earth’s environmental and natural resources are managed. For example, forests can be preserved in their natural state, harvested selectively and sustainably, clear-cut, or turned into farms, housing developments or shopping malls. Lax pollution regulations can permit industry to prosper, allowing higher wages, lower consumer prices and bigger investment returns for people who are saving for their retirements, or pollution can be tightly controlled to improve human health outcomes and protect ecological systems and their services.Different constituencies have different levels of desire for each of the range of possible management outcomes. The benefits or costs to individual humans under different management scenarios may be modest but widespread, or they may be large and concentrated among fewer people. The benefits may also accrue to very different groups of people than those who bear the costs. There are often benfits and costs from the way resources are managed that spill over onto third parties- who are not directly involved in the decisions that have been made and who therefore do not have any weight given to their preferences in these choices. Likewise, many resources belong to everyone but no one, and sustainable management is often fundamentally impossible without government intervention in the form of policies and regulations.We will explore how environmental and natural resource management decisions are made. Given that we need to use at least some natural resources to survive, it is not possible to completely eliminate all mining, fishing, or logging. Likewise, it is not possible to reduce all forms of pollution to zero. But how much of these activities is too much? We will examine some pragmatic criteria and some evidence which can be used to help guide decision-makers who are responsible for setting policies and regulations. We will pay particular attention to circumstances when government intervention is essential because private incentives definitely cannot be relied upon to yield socially desirable outcomes.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics SyllabusSchreiner
Imagine yourself in the following situation: you are in a room where you can press a button that says “If you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away”. What ethical reasons would you have to refrain from pressing that button? Is it morally wrong to destroy something we (humans) deem beautiful? Some philosophers believe that there is no moral value without a valuator. So, what if you were the last person on Earth and you would not care about the Grand Canyon, would it still be wrong to press the button? What if you were not the last person, would it suffice to appeal to the idea that you might deprive future generations from experiencing such ineffable scenery? Imagine the button says, “it you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away, but in doing so, you save x human lives.” How many human lives would justify blowing away the Grand Canyon? What if those lives are the lives of some people you will never know/meet with? Does it have to be a human life? What about a non-human animal life? What about an ecosystem?
ENVS 350 Ecology of Energy Generation SyllabusBothun
Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of renewable energy generation as well as discussion of our current trajectory and climate change.Currently, at the global scale, we are living in the most unsustainable period in history and yet the typical consumer remains blissfully ignorant and certainly doesn’t understand or care about why their individual consumption footprint might matter.Much of the current dilemma can be traced to one root cause: in simple terms – no one cares about doing math anymore – in more precise terms: there seems to be now a total apathy regarding the importance of quantitative reasoning (after all, isn’t there an APP for that anyway?) at virtually all levels of society. The inability to quantitatively understand our consumption scale and plan for the future makes it really impossible to do anything sensible. Urban legend and other wishful myths now become our planning tool. This problem has gotten substantially worse in the last decade. Its one thing to not be able to exercise quantitative reasoning but we are beyond that – now quantitative reasoning is not even thought of as being important.At the same time we are being told (through media and urban legend) that we are becoming greener and achieving sustainability. This course will critically and quantitatively examining that claim. What matters is not efficiency but overall throughput that human activities impress upon the global ecosystem. The acceleration of greenhouse gas pollution clearly shows that we are the exact opposite of becoming greener.
ENVS 400M/500M Passive Heating SyllabusRempel
Would it surprise you to learn that passive solar heating can be just as effective in cloudy climates as in sunny ones? In fact, the overcast winters of the Pacific Northwest, the Great Lakes, and northern coastal Europe have among the greatest solar heating potentials on Earth. In this course, we will revise a number of traditional ideas regarding passive solar design in light of contemporary solar radiation modeling, climatology, materials science, soil science, and computational advances. You’ll learn how to estimate a location’s net solar heating resource; to find the predominant orientation of that resource (it’s not always due south!); to select and orient solar collecting glass optimally; to design thermal mass to store transmitted heat and return it in patterns that match occupant needs; and to estimate passive solar performance with the most accurate methods available. Pair or small-group term projects will develop passive solar designs for diverse building types, incorporating spatial, experiential, and computational components; energy modeling and graphing will be included, but no prior
experience is assumed. This course will participate in the Sustainable City Year program, providing opportunities for field work, term projects, and planning input to the City of Albany, OR.
ENVS 410 Climate Action Read Sem. SyllabusBoulay
Through its Community Climate and Energy Action Plan, the City of Eugene has set ambitious goals for reducing community-wide fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions. Meeting those goals will require shifts in infrastructure and systems across Eugene, and will ask Eugene
residents to change the way they think about and use fossil fuels. In your spring term “Climate Action” project, you will assist the City’s efforts in increasing awareness of climate change and its impacts and in inspiring citizen action through outreach activities, including a social media
campaign framework and tabling activities. This reading course is designed to prepare you for your spring ELP project by introducing you to your team, community partners, project background and methods. In addition, you will brainstorm ideas and make a game plan so you can immediately launch your project spring term
ENVS 410 Forest Ecology SyllabusDickman
This course provides an overview of forest ecology, emphasizing forests of the Pacific Northwest, and also includes discussions of past and current laws and policies affecting management of forests on public lands in this region.It is intended for environmental studies and environmental science majors who have not completed and do not plan to take Bi 213 or Bi 283H which is the prerequisite to take Forest Biology, Bi 307. There is enough overlap
between Bi 307 and this class that students should not take both. Students should have junior or senior standing and have completed ENVS 202 (if ENVS major) or another similar introductory course in an environmental science (if ESCI major).In addition to learning important concepts, we will discuss current issues, we’ll get out in the forest to see firsthand examples of some local management and stewardship projects, and we will examine complex questions. You will be required to read, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate.
ENVS 410/510 Consumerism & Environment SyllabusMartin
Within the current world economy, great disparities between rich and poor persist. A relatively small percentage of the human population has access to a highly disproportionate share of natural resources, capital, information, and technology. At the same time, the economic behavior of this small segment of the population has profoundly altered the earth’s ecosystems. These disparities raise pressing ethical and environmental issues. As the title implies, this course explores the environmental impacts of affluent consumers in the current world economic system. We will attempt to articulate specific relationships, identify areas of environmental and social concern, and explore possible mechanisms for effectively addressing these issues. Key concepts and ideas we will examine include: consumerism, affluence, the ethics of disparity, eco-labeling, full cycle analysis, commodification, green marketing, convivial technology, new consumer societies, voluntary simplicity, DIY, and various alternatives to over-consumption.My goals for the class are threefold: (1) that you become better informed about the links between consumerism, consumption, and the environment; (2) that you sharpen your critical thinking skills about these relationships through writing, reading, lectures, videos and class discussion; and (3) that we move beyond problem identification towards creative solutions. I will do my best to create an enjoyable atmosphere of respect and intellectual integrity. In turn it is essential that you be committed to taking an active role in your learning process.
ENVS 410 Data Mgmt and Visualization SyllabusHallett
This course covers the non-statistical aspects of the data life cycle, including how to store, clean, visualize and communicate data (Figure 1). It is intended as a complement to statistics courses – we will cover how to get your data into shape for analysis, and how to communicate your findings visually. It is primarily a methods class and will be taught in R (but there is no expectation that students know R coming in).
ENVS 411 Top Food, Trees, Culture SyllabusFaye
The purpose of this course is to make students of environmental studies, food studies and other natural resources disciplines familiar with the major types of sustainable agroforestry systems used by people in both developed and developing countries and inform them about the ecological benefits they provide to humans, plants, animals, and to
the environment. This course aims to educate students interested in the interaction of biophysical, social, political and economic issues underlying the adoption and application of world agroforestry systems. The lectures emphasize the basic components and concepts of cognate subjects of agroforestry and human-environment relations. Assigned readings add training in analyzing complex social and ecological systems and specific applications such as nut-tree crop combinations, forest farming, carbon farming, and concepts of climate change adaption.
ENVS 425 Top Env Ed Theory and Practice SyllabusLynch
This class is the first quarter of the Environmental Leadership Program’s two-quarter Environmental Education Initiative. During the winter we will explore various educational theories and the rationale for getting children outside. We will cultivate our own ecological literacy as we develop our skills as environmental educators. Developing sensory awareness – both ours and the children we work with – will be central to our mission. You will work in your team to apply your skills, strengths and creativity towards developing educational materials that will help children connect to the magnificent natural world. Then during spring term you will deliver your environmental education program – in the classroom and in the field. This year the three EE teams and community partners are:
Canopy Connections – H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest and Pacific Tree Climbing Institute
Restoring Connections – Mt. Pisgah Arboretum and Adams Elementary
Cultivating Connections – School Garden Project of Lane County
ENVS 427 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring SyllabusBoulay
Environmental scientists collect, analyze and share information for a variety of reasons. Your specific objectives will shape your questions, which in turn, will drive your project design and methods. In the
Environmental Leadership Program’s (ELP) “Conservation Science in Action” projects, students collect and use information to assist our community partners with ecological research, habitat restoration, management planning, species conservation and other needs. This course is designed to prepare you for your spring ELP projects by introducing you to your team, community partners, project background and protocols. We will also examine the entire process of designing and implementing a monitoring or research program. We will investigate several local case studies and gain hands-on experience using common techniques to collect,
manage, summarize and present data. ELP projects all use common techniques to address current conservation issues, so these case studies are relevant to our course work regardless of your affiliation with a
particular ELP project. In addition, we will practice some fundamental skills that all field-based environmental scientists should know.
ENVS 465 Wetland Ecology/Management SyllabusBridgham
This is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate course that examines management and policy issues relating to wetlands, while providing enough scientific background to understand these issues. The course is divided into three parts (see syllabus). The first section includes an overview of cultural perceptions of wetlands and how these have changed through time, a general description of different types of wetlands, and then a more in-depth discussion of jurisdictional wetland definitions, classification schemes, wetland distributions globally and in the U.S., and current and historical wetland loss rates. The middle section is an introduction to wetland ecology and includes factors controlling their formation and development over time on the landscape, an introduction to hydrology as it pertains to wetlands, hydric soils, and plant community ecology. It focuses on the three main criteria for most definitions of wetlands: hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation. The last part of the course returns in more depth to the management and policy issues that were introduced in the beginning of the term. We will discuss wetland laws and policy in Oregon, the U.S., and globally, mapping and delineation of wetlands, and wetland restoration and creation.In a single quarter, we cannot cover all aspects of wetland ecology and/or wetland management. The emphasis of this course is on management and policy issues relating to wetlands, with hopefully enough science provided to properly evaluate these more applied concerns.

Fall 2017

ENVS 201 Intro Environmental Studies: Social Science (4 cr) ( >2) SyllabusMartin
Environmental Studies 201 introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, conservation, life-cycle analysis and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, and natural and social capital. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. We will focus on issues that include global warming, consumerism, biodiversity conservation and energy reform.
ENVS 203 Intro Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) (>1) SyllabusLemenager
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. (The course must be taken for a grade in order to satisfy ENVS/ESCI major
ENVS 225 Intro Food Studies (>2) (>IC) SyllabusWooten
An exploration of the field of “food studies” and examination of the role of food in historical and contemporary life in the US and around the world.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (>1) SyllabusMorar
Why should I really care about the environment? What makes environmental issues genuine moral issues?
Imagine yourself in the following situation: you are in a room where you can press a button that says “If you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away”. What philosophical/ethical reasons would you have to refrain from pressing that button? Are there any such reasons? Is it morally wrong to destroy something we (humans) deem beautiful? Some philosophers believe that there is no moral value without a valuator. So, what if you were the last person on Earth and you would not care about the Grand Canyon, would it still be wrong to press the button? And even if you were not the last person, would it suffice to appeal to the idea that you might deprive future generations from experiencing such ineffable scenery? Imagine the button says, “it you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away, but in doing so, you save x human lives.” How many lives would justify blowing away the Grand Canyon? What if those lives are the lives of some people you will never know/meet with? Does it have to be a human life? What about a non-human animal life? What about an ecosystem?
ENVS 400M/500M Climate-Responsive Design Syllabus Rempel
How did people design their shelters for thermal comfort, and even thermal delight, before fossil fuels made mechanical heating and cooling possible? This course explores the world’s diversity of climates and biomess, focusing on indigenous building practices developed over centuries of experimentation and innovation. These structures are formed by necessity of local wood, stone, skins, leaves, and earth. They are also often assembled to connect human communities with minimal need for transportation, and they have met great pressures to minimize energy use for providing warmth and coolness. As such, they form the great majority of the world’s truly sustainable buildings, and they offer fascinating lessons for contemporary green design. The goals of this course are to reveal these lessons, to evaluate existing green buildings in light of them, and ultimately to apply them in the redesign of existing projects. This is a seminar course taught through class discussion and field investigation. Discoveries, insights, and experimentation will be synthesized through weekly assignments and a term project.
ENVS 411 Coastal Cities & Climate Change SyllabusPravin
This course will be an exploration of how cities and regional governments in coastal areas are planning for the impacts of climate change as well as hastening to mitigate carbon pollution through development (or perhaps lack of development), smarter planning, rebuilding infrastructure, and policy. We will be looking at case studies from around the world to critically analyze these strategies from a perspective of social justice and environmental degradation
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership Program, Destination: Deschutes!
Syllabus
Boulay
In this unique expedition-based ELP project, students are assisting U.S. Forest Service botanists at Newberry Volcanic National Monument (part of Deschutes National Forest in Central Oregon). Through multiple camping trips to Newberry caldera, the team is mapping the locations of six priority invasive species. Students are evaluating the success of past control efforts and making management recommendations for the future. In addition, they are revisiting research plots and examining factors that may help conserve whitebark pine, an imperiled keystone species. Watch this space for updates and a link to their website. (This project made possible by the Douglas C. Laidlaw Charitable Fund. )
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice SyllabusBacon
In this class we will consider how environmental conditions produce and are in-turn shaped by social inequality. The course is interdisciplinary with a focus on the environmental social sciences (sociology, geography, political science, law) and on the environmental humanities (philosophy, literature, history). Students will learn the basic history of, and theories / methods applied to Environmental Justice.
ENVS 477/577 Soil Science SyllabusSilva
Chemical and physical characteristics and classification of soils, field soil identification, soil degradation.

2016-2017

Spring 2017

ENVS 202 Intro Env Stu: Natural Science (4 cr) Syllabus Rempel
The natural and applied sciences underlying contemporary environmental issues- microbiology, physiology, aquatic and atmospheric chemistry, population ecology, freshwater hydrology, oceanography, climate science, fluid dynamics, agronomy, wind, solar, and nuclear engineering, transportation engineering, and many others- are essential background for environmental decision-making at all scales. With an understanding of photosynthesis, the carbon biochemical cycle, and contemporary agricultural practices, for example, one can better evaluate conflicting claims regarding the benefits and harms of particular bio fuels. This course is focused on the acquisition and use of such evidence, i.e. quantitative, scientific evidence, to support and refute arguments surrounding environmental issues. In this way, it promotes the acquisition of “science literacy”, the ability to work fluently with observations, measurements, model predictions, survey results, maps, graphs, and other forms of scientific data toward a desired end: an evidence-based argument, policy, interpretation, or perspective. Environmental action is often political, in that it relies on human decisions made with incomplete information and influenced by conflicting goals and desires. This course will explore the boundaries between environmental science and environmental action closely, drawing on some of the most influential, engaging, and controversial environmental science writing available and asking students to respond critically through their own writing and section discussions.
ENVS 203 Intro Env Stu: Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus
Bacon
WHAT? This course is a survey of the contribution of
humanities disciplines—literature, intellectual history, religious
studies, and philosophy—to understanding the relationship
between human beings and the natural environment.HOW? The course emphasizes the skills of textual and
cultural interpretation, reasoning, and critical inquiry through
active engagement with a variety of theoretical concepts and
texts.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics
(4 cr) Syllabus
Schreiner
Environmental ethics invites us into an exploration of the role of values in shaping our relations with the environment and other living beings, including our personal perspectives and actions, and the policies and practices of institutions at all levels, from local to global. Quite literally, environmental ethics directs us to ask what in our environment is (most) valuable to us, why it matters, and why we – and others – should care about it enough to preserve, conserve, defend, restore, build, extend, stand or fight for it. In other words, what has moral standing, and what does “having” moral standing mean for our relations with other beings and things? Ethical consideration thus compels us to identify and justify our perspectives, interpretations, claims, beliefs, and actions through careful scrutiny of reasons and evidence, especially in those instances when values and facts don’t align.It can be a demanding endeavor, but its demands are premised on hope “because it rests on the conviction that we can do better. As reflective, thinking beings, we can learn from our successes and our failures, and as empathic, caring beings, we can take into account the well being of other persons, other living beings, and our planet as a whole” (Hourdequin, p. 3). Those are reasonable claims to justify why we ought to engage in environmental ethical study – using what Martin Luther King, Jr. called a “tough mind and a tender heart.” Our course will uphold the spirit of this conviction as we accept the invitation to explore our values together, to determine what matters, and to express our aspirations for how we and our world ought to be.
ENVS 375 Oregon Seminar, part of Oregon Abroad SyllabusDennis
By the end of the term, in combination with work done in our other Oregon Abroad courses, you should be able to:Trace the physical, natural, and cultural history of the Oregon landscape, particularly from the mid-19thcentury to the present.Explain Oregon as “landscape”—that is, as physical space that is simultaneously natural and cultural.Critically analyze, interpret, and integrate a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary materials in the Sciences and Humanities that inform us about Oregon’s dynamic and diverse physical and natural environment.Write essays that present and develop your own argument or thesis, illustrated and supported by evidence.Assess and contextualize information about contemporary environmental problems that confront Oregon, including those in the realm of social and environmental justice.
ENVS 410 Water, Pub Health, Env
(4 cr) Syllabus
Russel
Water, public health and the environment will examine the provision of water and sanitation services around the world with a particular focus on cases studies from low and middle income countries in Africa and South East Asia. This course will examine: – The current crisis of access to water, sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) services and infrastructure around the world. – The public health and environmental impacts of insufficient WASH services. – Technology, planning and policy options for expanding WASH services. – The economic and behavioral barriers to the adoption of WASH technologies and services. – The human right to WASH and its impacts on market-based approaches to service delivery.
ENVS 411 Top Environmental Interpretation and CommunicationWillingham
Environmental interpreters connect people to resources. They bridge the meanings of our resources to the interests of the people. And through this, interpreters inspire people to care about our resources enough to protect them. Environmental interpreters are the nation’s park rangers, museum guides, zoo educators, and living history reenactors. The goal for this course is to help prepare students for careers or jobs in environmental interpretation and communication, such as in the National Park Service, US Forest Service, cultural heritage and historical sites, or in the public, private, or non-profit environmental sectors.We will critically examine the foundations of environmental interpretation and gain the tools needed to develop our own interpretive programs and create effective environmental communication. We will have the opportunity to observe real interpretive programs at local parks and museums, and by the end of the course you will lead your own interpretive program. These experiential components will be augmented by readings and in-class discussions to develop an understanding of the history of environmental interpretation and communication, power and privilege in the environmental field, and best practices to follow.
ENVS 411 Top Conservation and Community Areas: Perspective on Parks and Protected Areas
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
From Malheur to Madagascar, protected areas (PAs) are the cornerstone of strategies to preserve biodiversity. While the bulk of the world’s biodiversity is located in developing countries of the global South, international initiative and funding for conservation stems largely from the industrialized nations of the North. By necessity, international discourse regarding preservation of biodiversity involves a wide range of actors and interest groups. While the language of sustainable development and eco-toursim suggests a possible synergy between conservation and human welfare, in practice the relationship remains problematic and highly politicized. Scientists, politicians and local residents literally and figuratively speak different languages and attach various meanings to the notions of nature, wilderness, biodiversity, and development. These contested meanings have profound implications for protected area management. As a class, we will establish a set of criteria for evaluating conservation practice and policy as reflected in various case studies throughout the world. In the process we will critique our own values and assumption regarding the constructs of nature, culture, development and scientific knowledge.
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership Program (ELP)
(4 cr) EE Syllabus CSA Syllabus
Lynch/Boulay
This class is the second quarter of the ELP’s two-quarter Environmental Education (EE) and Conservation Science in Action (CSA) projects. This spring you will have the opportunity to implement your community based projects and continue to develop your collaboration and leadership skills. The success of this term – even more so than last term – depends upon your active involvement: identifying next steps and taking action to make sure your project is successful. It is up to you to identify issues and opportunities as they arise and to deal with them immediately. Active participation is central to all projects! As a team, you will be responsible for the learning that occurs. Everyone is expected to work together, share their perspectives and ensure this is a rewarding learning experience for all. The ELP provides you with an opportunity to be involved in your community, as well as time to reflect and discuss these experiences. Inspiring an ethic of civic engagement is integral to all ELP projects. The ELP is designed to develop your communication, critical thinking and problem-solving skills and give you the confidence to take leadership roles regarding environmental issues.

Winter 2017

ENVS 201 Intro Env Stu: Social Science (4 cr) SyllabusWalker
Environmental Studies 201 introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. This course is not about environmental topics (climate change, deforestation, toxics, etc.). It is about learning to think critically about why these problems happen and what it might take to solve them. Humans aren’t stupid, and environmentally harmful human behavior isn’t inevitable: rather, it is a product of specific social as well as physical conditions. Those conditions can be studied and understood. An understanding of the social root causes of environmental
problems is an essential step in finding effective ways to prevent and resolve such problems. As such, this course examines both mainstream and non-conventional approaches to understanding and resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements to promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course students will learn to think critically about the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches and how these approaches can be used in integrative and interdisciplinary ways.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr)
Syllabus
Dickman
By the end of the term, you should be able to:
• describe the value and limitation of science in understanding environmental issues
• explain how scientific research is done and what motivates scientists
• identify causal relationships, feedback loops, and construct concept maps
• interpret and analyze information presented in graphical format
• talk and write in an informed way about several environmental issues including:
o environmental and ecological history of the Willamette Valley
o ecosystem change, species diversity, keystone species, indicator species
o population ecology models and their application to humans and wildlife
o Earth’s atmosphere, climate change, and human impacts on climate change
• have confidence in your ability to make decisions consistent with your knowledge and values
about one environmental issue that is of special interest to you
ENVS 410 Nature in Popular Culture
(4 cr) Syllabus
Wald
This course examines the various ways that nature is represented in U.S. popular culture. What can advertisements, films, television, and video games teach us about the ways we imagine nature and the environment? What ideas about nature are conveyed by zoos, aquariums, and nature-oriented theme parks? Popular culture representations of nature tell us more than how we imagine nature and the environment. They also articulate and naturalize ideas about race, gender, sexuality, and ability. They present certain kinds of identities as natural and normative and other kinds of identities as unnatural or out of place in nature. We will examine the politics of identity and environment in depictions of SeaWorld, gay penguins, and Mother Earth. What is at stake in movies like Pocahontas, Avatar, and Moana? How are ideas about race and colonialism communicated in advertisements for the Discovery Channel and The Body Shop? We will explore the ways that representations of nature can at times justify existing relationships of power and privilege in society and the ways in which such representations may also at times contest those existing relationships of power and privilege.
ENVS 411 Topic: Farmworkers & Food Justice
(4 cr) Syllabus
Hishida
Environmental justice refers to the unequal distribution of environmental benefits, environmental risks, and environmental burdens. Food justice also addresses inequality, but is instead in reference to unequal access to food for consumption as well as the benefits of food production. At the intersection of these two fields, we find the racial, economic, and social inequalities seen in issues of farmworker justice. By exploring numerous issues facing farmworkers through an Environmental Justice framework, you will become familiar with some major themes of Food Justice. Such themes include the exploitation and permeability of farmworkers’ bodies, institutional marginalization of farmworkers, and the inability of current alternative food movements to address these issues. Just as Environmental Justice has diverged from traditional Environmentalism in light of the movement’s failure to address structural discrimination against low-­‐income, communities of color, the Food Justice movement has grown in response to the mainstream Alternative Food Movement. This divergence has occurred in order to promote equity and justice for similarly marginalized communities that are exploited throughout the food production process.Together we will explore why these communities struggle to access healthy, affordable, and culturally appropriate food in a system for which they are the very foundation of.
ENVS 425 Environmental Education (ELP)
(4 cr) Syllabus
Lynch
This class is the first quarter of the Environmental Leadership Program’s two-quarter Environmental Education Initiative. During the winter we will explore various educational theories and the rationale for getting children outside. We will cultivate our own ecological literacy as we develop our skills as environmental educators. Developing sensory awareness – both ours and the children we work with – will be central to our mission. You will work in your team to apply your skills, strengths and creativity towards developing educational materials that will help children connect to the magnificent natural world. Then during spring term you will deliver your environmental education program – in the classroom and in the field. This year the three EE teams and community partners are:Canopy Connections – H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest and Pacific Tree Climbing InstituteRestoring Connections – Mt. Pisgah Arboretum and Adams ElementarySchool Garden Team – School Garden Project
ENVS 427 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring
(4 cr) Syllabus
Boulay
Environmental scientists collect, analyze and share information for a variety of reasons. Your specific objectives will shape your questions which in turn will drive your project design and methods. In the Environmental Leadership Program’s (ELP) “Conservation Science in Action” projects, students collect and use information to assist our community partners with ecological research, habitat restoration, management planning, species conservation and other needs. This course is designed to prepare you for your spring ELP projects by introducing you to your team, community partners, project background and protocols. We will also examine the entire process of designing and implementing a monitoring or research program. We will investigate several local case studies and gain hands-on experience using common techniques to collect, manage, summarize and present data. The ELP projects all use established techniques to address current conservation issues, so these case studies are relevant to our course work regardless of your affiliation with a particular ELP project. In addition, we will practice some fundamental skills that all field-based environmental scientists should know.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice
(4 cr) Syllabus
Norgaard
How and why are environmental problems experienced differently according to race, gender and class? How do different communities experience and respond to environmental problems? Why does it matter that there is unequal exposure to environmental risks and benefits? What do we learn about the meaning of gender, race and class by studying the patterns of exposure and creative resistance of different communities to environmental hazards? In other words, what does the study of environmental risks tell us about racism, classism, sexism in our nation and world today? What is environmental privilege and why does it matter? These are some of the questions we will take up in the next ten weeks together. This course will be highly reading and discussion intensive. Environmental justice is one of the most important and active sites of environmental scholarship and activism in our country today. We will read classics and new material and work both inside and outside the classroom. In particular, we are very fortunate that the largest public interest environmental law conference in the country is held annually here in Eugene Oregon. Attendance is mandatory as we will integrate ideas, issues and information from the conference into our class.
ENVS 455 Sustainability
(4 cr) Syllabus
Walker
This course is about the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its now complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policy makers, environmentalists and businesses. The course examines the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for sustainability. A concept that means all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to help students to go beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit and rigorous thinking about sustainability that is supported by sound theory and evidence, as
well as efforts to understand and reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept. This is a “tough love” course for sustainability: by examining sustainability with a critical eye, students will be better positioned help make sustainability “real” through rigorous thinking about how to make it ecologically sound, socially effective, ethically and culturally defensible, and technologically achievable. This course is intended to help us find a path to a more meaningful, just, and practical sustainability.
ENVS 477 Soil Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Hopple
This course will introduce students to the wonderful world of soils that lie, often forgotten, beneath your feet every day. Soils are one of the most fundamental ecological constraints on patterns and processes of plant distributions, nutrient and water cycling, and the productivity of both natural and managed ecosystems. Soils are also an important component of many current and historical environmental problems.
For Environmental Science majors, this course satisfies an upper division elective (Area 3A) in natural sciences. It is also widely applicable to graduate and undergraduate students in Biology, Geography, Geology, Anthropology, and Landscape Architecture, along with other majors on campus. This course is open to undergraduate juniors and seniors who have completed a general chemistry sequence (CHEM 221-223, 224-226H or equivalent).

Fall 2016

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
Environmental Studies 201 introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, conservation, life-cycle analysis and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, and natural and social capital. In this course students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. We will focus on issues that include global warming, consumerism, biodiversity conservation and energy reform.
ENVS 203: Introduction to Environmental Studies Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus
Wald
This course introduces humanities approaches to environmental studies. We do so by focusing on two different landscapes common in Oregon – forests and fields. We will look at the history, ideology, and debates over public lands, including conservation, federal management, Native perspectives, and labor. In relation to farming, we will consider the legacy of Thomas Jefferson’s writings, slavery, and immigration to contemporary debates over agriculture. The class introduces the history of particular places and parses out some of the differing ideologies at the heart of contemporary environmental conflicts. Particular attention is paid to race, class, gender, and colonialism. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors (The course must be taken for a grade in order to satisfy ENVS/ESCI major requirements).
ENVS 345: Environmental Ethics
(4 cr) Syllabus
Morar
Why should I really care about the environment? What makes environmental issues genuine
moral issues?This course has a number of learning outcomes. The instructors are interested in working with you to develop a series of more general skills that you will need during your college education and even after graduation. These include the ability to:
• Enhance reading skills (from philosophical texts to more science-oriented texts).
• Articulate, evaluate, and engage with (philosophical) arguments.
• Explain and summarize different approaches to environmental ethics.
• Develop communication and argumentation skills; especially, learning the difference between ‘stating an opinion’ and ‘arguing for a conclusion’.
• Develop writing skills and learn how to manage your thinking-process in a limited amount of time.
ENVS 350: The Ecological Footprint of Energy Generation
(4 cr) Syllabus
Bothun
The current ecological footprint of our energy and electricity generation takes the primary form of dumping waste heat into the surface layers of the ocean. In turn that leads to climate changes if that excess heat can’t be mixed rapidly. The oceans are currently near there saturation point which means that the rate of climate change is accelerating  (while this video is a bit dated,  the global situation nevertheless continues in the manner described, meaning that posting a video on YouTube doesn’t change a damn thing …)
ENVS 411: Food, Trees and Culture—Indigenous Sustainable Agroforestry Systems
(4 cr) Syllabus
Faye
The purpose of this course is to make students of environmental studies, food studies and other natural resources disciplines familiar with the major types of sustainable agroforestry systems used by people in both developed and developing countries, and to inform them about the ecological benefits they provide to humans, plants, animals, and the environment. It also considers the major critiques of the limits and potential romanticism of agroforestry. This course aims to educate students interested in the interaction of biophysical, social, political and economic issues underlying the adoption and application of world agroforestry systems. The lectures emphasize the basic components and concepts of cognate subjects of agroforestry and human environment relations. Assigned readings add training in analyzing complex social and ecological systems and specific applications such as nut-tree crop combinations, forest farming,carbon farming, and notions of climate change mitigation and adaption.
ENVS 411: Oil & Culture
(4 cr) Syllabus
Bacon
This course investigates the cultural values, representations, understandings and material manifestations of oil. Throughout this course, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to consider what the humanities can add to the important conversations about understanding climate change and the culture of oil that has produced it.Overall, this course will ask you to use the tools you’ve collected from your time as an Environmental Studies or Sciences major, drawing on backgrounds in the sciences, social sciences and humanities.Check out the syllabus for an extensive list of course objectives.
ENVS 450: Political Ecology
(4 cr) Syllabus
Walker
Political ecology examines the politics, in the broadest sense of the word, of the environment. Whereas “environmental politics” courses often focus on the role of government and interest groups in shaping environmental policies, political ecology expands our understanding of politics to examine the roles of: globalized capitalism; relations of power and inequality between and among social actors (differentiated, for example, by class, race, or gender); social institutions, such as land tenure; government, nongovernmental organizations, and social movements; and language, symbolism, and discourse as they shape human interactions with the physical environment. Although much political ecology research comes from studies of the less-developed ‘third world,’ this course also emphasizes the political ecology of the ‘first world’.
ENVS 467: Issues in Sustainable Agriculture
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
The purpose of the class is for students to develop an informed critique of agricultural production.  We will review traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and GMC (genetically modified crops)-based systems through the lens of sustainability.  For our purposes, sustainability includes not only environmental, but also economic and cultural considerations.  While holding a holistic perspective, the course examines the various material components of production systems.  In each unit we will highlight problems and explore alternatives to current methods of production.  Finally, we will discuss food policy and food security.  The greatest single share of the course material stems from North American experience but the class is decidedly global in scope.By course end students will have a fundamental understanding of how food is produced, the options and constraints of producers, and the obstacles and potential for more sustainable food production systems.

2015-2016

Spring 2016

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Dickman
This course is part of the three term core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for Environmental Studies (but not Environmental Science) majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies university general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. ENVS 201, 202, 203 may be taken in any order.By the end of the term, you should be able to:
• describe the value and limitation of science in understanding environmental issues
• explain how scientific research is done and what motivates some scientists
• identify causal relationships, feedback loops, and construct concept maps
• interpret and analyze information presented in graphical format
• talk or write in an informed way about several environmental issues including:
o environmental and ecological history of the Willamette Valley
o ecosystem change, species diversity, keystone species, indicator species
o population ecology models and their application to humans and wildlife
o Earth’s atmosphere, climate change, and human impacts on climate change
• have confidence in your ability to make decisions consistent with your knowledge and values about one environmental issue that is of special interest to you
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus
LeMenager
In this course we will learn about what the Humanities are, as an interdisciplinary field, and how Humanities methods and research contribute to environmental thought and action. The class involves reading and research but also creativity and innovation. It is a lab in which we will think together about the possible futures of our stressed planet and how to harness imagination in the service of sustainability.
ENVS 345: Environmental Ethics
(4 cr) Syllabus
Toadvine
Intended for an interdisciplinary audience, this course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics with an eye toward their application in environmental conservation and management as well as in daily life. Topics covered include the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, the ethical value of nature and non-human species, the relation between economic and ethical evaluations, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. These perspectives are applied in the second half of the course to issues of food production and climate change. The course counts toward major requirements in Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, and Philosophy, and fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group
ENVS 410: Nature in Urban Design
(4 cr) Syllabus
Meier
This course takes as a starting point the claim that a defining element of environmental studies is active engagement with real-world socio-environmental situations. Through lecture, in-class discussion, regular field exercises and a series of three field trips, students will encounter theory, practice and firsthand experience of the built environment. The course is intended to provide theoretical and real-world grounding in contemporary urban planning and design for non-design/planning majors. It is also intended to provide all students with some conceptual and empirical tools to be able to engage critically with the material aspects of the communities in which they live. The course provides an introduction to planning and design theory and practice and is appropriate for students without a design background..
ENVS 410/510: Philosophy of Ecology
(4 cr ) Syllabus
Morar
  Given the stakes, climate change is perhaps the defining issue of our age. How we respond (or don’t) to this issue will likely influence the course of human existence for generations to come. But is this simply a technological or economic problem waiting to be solved by the experts, as most Westerners believe? Or, as many are now claiming, is this primarily an issue of ethics and justice? The implications of climate change throw basic assumptions about how we live our lives and how we think into question. Perhaps no other issue compels us to so thoroughly reexamine how we relate to nature and to each other. Thus, as we struggle to confront the depth and gravity of climate change, new ways of thinking and living are increasingly called for. This course is designed to offer a variety of inter-disciplinary perspectives and approaches to this end.
ENVS 411: Envrionment and Globalization
(4 cr) Syllabus
Dockstader
Since all economic activity depends on the integrity of the natural world, it is paramount that we understand the forces shaping the global economy and what the ecological implications are of this economic activity. This analyzes and critiques the international economic regime known as “globalization.” Rather than focusing exclusively on history, theories of globalization and free trade agreements, we will view globalization in its contested framework with regard to the environment. We will look at four areas of concern: land, water, energy and climate and evaluate globalization’s actual and potential effects on them.
ENVS 411: Economic Instruments
(4 cr) Syllabus
Kolstoe
In this course, we will examine each of the main three types of market-based methods for environmental and resource management: (i) price-based, (ii) property rights based, and (iii) legal, voluntary and information-based. For each method, the intuition for how the method works will be presented in class prior to introducing real-world examples of these methods in action. In addition, students will read articles from the literature about the use of market-based methods in policy contexts. These readings will give students a fuller understanding of how such policies are evaluated and what are the key lessons to retain and apply when formulating future market-based environmental and resource management policies. We will focus on the question of why one specific method may be chosen over another, any implementation difficulties the policy may have had, and what adaptations may have been made to each policy as a result.
ENVS 477/577: Soil Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Pfeifer-Meister
This course will introduce students to the wonderful world of soils that lie, often forgotten, beneath your feet every day. Soils are one of the most fundamental ecological constraints on patterns and processes of plant distributions, nutrient and water cycling, and the productivity of both natural and managed ecosystems. Soils are also an important component of many current and historical environmental problems.For Environmental Science majors, this course satisfies an upper division elective (Area 3A) in natural sciences. It is also widely applicable to graduate and undergraduate students in Biology, Geography, Geology, Anthropology, and Landscape Architecture, along with other majors on campus. This course is open to graduate students and undergraduate juniors and seniors who have completed a general chemistry sequence (CHEM 221-223, 224-226H or equivalent).

Winter 2016

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Schreiner
Through engagement with some of the significant social-environmental challenges of our time, our course will explore ways in which social processes shape ecological systems and influence human actions. Our primary goal will be to develop a “socioecological imagination” or the abilities 1) to examine ecological problems as shaped by uneven social forces; and 2) to envision research-based, solution-oriented alternatives that empower individuals and communities. The main social-scientific tools we will use include key concepts and methods of critical social inquiry, participatory action research, and mindfulness-based transformative learning. We will refine our focus through the thematic lenses of environmental justice, political ecology, and economic democracy. Adding these social-scientific tools and thematic lenses to your toolkit will enable you to develop a more sophisticated understanding of social-environmental issues, of the potential options to address them, and of your own capacity to contribute meaningfully to making change happen.  We will take the cultivation of a socioecological imagination very seriously, and this means we will need to think honestly, critically, and creatively about the knowledge and skills we will encounter, examine our own experiences and observations, and be open to perspectives, data, and analyses that challenge our assumptions.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Sutherland
This course is part of the three term core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for Environmental Studies (but not Environmental Science) majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies university general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. ENVS 201, 202, 203 may be taken in any order. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 335: Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources
(4 cr) Syllabus
Cameron
Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations. We will explore how environmental and natural resource management decisions are made. Given that we need to use at least some natural resources to survive, it is not possible to completely eliminate all mining, fishing, or logging. Likewise, it is not possible to reduce all forms of pollution to zero. But how much of each of these activities is too much? We will examine some pragmatic criteria and some evidence which can be used to help guide decision-makers who are responsible for setting policies and regulations. We will pay particular attention to circumstances when government intervention is essential because private incentives definitely cannot be relied upon to yield socially desirable outcomes.
ENVS 411: Top Armed Conflicts
(4 cr) Syllabus
Bacon
This course aims to explore the relationship between the natural environment and armed social conflict. Students will consider the complex relationship between armed conflicts over ecology and the ecological impacts of armed conflict. Students will be asked to think critically about narratives of scarcity, security, and nationalism in the context of globalization, neo-colonialism, and transnational capitalism.
ENVS 411: Top Climate Ethics
(4 cr ) Syllabus
Myers
  Given the stakes, climate change is perhaps the defining issue of our age. How we respond (or don’t) to this issue will likely influence the course of human existence for generations to come. But is this simply a technological or economic problem waiting to be solved by the experts, as most Westerners believe? Or, as many are now claiming, is this primarily an issue of ethics and justice? The implications of climate change throw basic assumptions about how we live our lives and how we think into question. Perhaps no other issue compels us to so thoroughly reexamine how we relate to nature and to each other. Thus, as we struggle to confront the depth and gravity of climate change, new ways of thinking and living are increasingly called for. This course is designed to offer a variety of inter-disciplinary perspectives and approaches to this end.
ENVS 425 Top Environmental Education Theory and Practice
(4 cr)  Syllabus
Lynch
This class is the first quarter of the Environmental Leadership Program’s two-quarter Environmental Education Initiative. During the winter we will explore various educational theories and the rationale for getting children outside. We will cultivate our own ecological literacy as we develop our skills as environmental educators. This year we are focusing on developing sensory awareness. You will work in your team to apply your skills, strengths and creativity towards developing educational materials that will help children connect to the magnificent natural world. Then during spring term you will deliver your environmental education program – in the classroom and in the field. This year the two EE teams and community partners are:
Canopy Connections – H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest and Pacific Tree Climbing Institute
Restoring Connections – Mt. Pisgah Arboretum and Adams Elementary
ENVS 427 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring
(4 cr) Syllabus 
Boulay
Environmental scientists collect, analyze and share information for a variety of reasons. In this course, we will use a broad definition of environmental and ecological monitoring, one that encompasses a variety of activities, including rigorous research and long-term surveillance. Your specific objectives will shape your questions which in turn will drive your project design and methods. In the Environmental Leadership Program’s (ELP) “Conservation Science in Action” projects, students collect and use information to assist our community partners with habitat restoration, management planning, species conservation and other needs. This course is designed to prepare you for your spring ELP projects by introducing you to your team, community partners, project background and protocols. However, to be an effective field scientist, you need to know more than one or two methodologies. We will examine the entire process of designing and implementing a monitoring program. We will investigate several local case studies and gain hands-on experience using common techniques to collect, manage, summarize and present data. The ELP projects all use established techniques to address current conservation issues, so these case studies are relevant to our course work regardless of your affiliation with a particular ELP project. In addition, we will practice some fundamental skills that all field-based environmental scientists should know.
ENVS 455 Sustainability
(4 cr) Syllabus
Meier
This course is about the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policy makers, environmentalists and businesses. The course examines the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for sustainability. A concept means that all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to help students to go beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit and rigorous thinking about sustainability that is supported by sound theory and evidence, as well as efforts to understand reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept. Prereq for 455: ENVS 201.
ENVS 465/565 Wetland Ecological Management
(4 cr)  Syllabus
Bridgham
This is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate course that examines management and policy issues relating to wetlands, while providing enough scientific background to understand these issues.  The course is divided into three parts (see syllabus). The first section includes an overview of cultural perceptions of wetlands and how these have changed through time, a general description of different types of wetlands, and then a more in-depth discussion of jurisdictional wetland definitions, classification schemes, wetland distributions globally and in the U.S., and current and historical wetland loss rates.  The middle section is an introduction to wetland ecology and includes factors controlling their formation and development over time on the landscape, an introduction to hydrology as it pertains to wetlands, hydric soils, and plant community ecology.  It focuses on the three main criteria for most definitions of wetlands:  hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation.  The last part of the course returns in more depth to the management and policy issues that were introduced in the beginning of the term.  We will discuss wetland laws and policy in Oregon, the U.S., and globally, mapping and delineation of wetlands, and wetland restoration and creation. In a single quarter, we cannot cover all aspects of wetland ecology and/or wetland management.  The emphasis of this course is on management and policy issues relating to wetlands, with hopefully enough science provided to properly evaluate these more applied concerns.

Fall 2015

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusWalker
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus
Wald
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 225 Introduction to Food Studies (4 cr) SyllabusWooten
Food plays an integral role in our lives, socially, economically, physically and culturally. Academia has traditionally given food very little attention, but now is your chance. Learn about how individuals and communities choose and obtain food, where that food comes from, where it goes and how food systems around the world affect the environment.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusMorar
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 411 Cultures of Oil, Cultures of Climate Change
(4 cr) Syllabus Flyer
McHolm
Imagination has material consequences. The root causes of climate change derive from a set of cultural values and understandings. These values and understandings are produced and reproduced, in part, by the tremendous capacity of petroleum.  Oil’s undeniable power has not only made possible most of the elements of mainstream American and, in many cases, global culture, it has produced the conditions of anthropogenic climate change. But how do we see petroleum? How do we experience climate change? The hard sciences have contributed invaluable data and resources to help us understand these processes, but is this the same thing as “knowing” them? As experiencing them? Can we expect a solution from the same ways of thinking and acting that have produced the problem in the first place? To answer these questions, we must turn to an understanding of culture.This course investigates the cultural values, representations, understandings and material manifestations of oil and climate change. Throughout this course, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach to consider what the humanities can add to the important conversations about understanding climate change and the culture of oil that has produced it.  We will begin our course with an overview of the processes of climate change and oil’s role in those processes. From this foundation, we will begin to explore how the arts and culture have produced, and then responded to, a culture made possible by cheap and available oil. Throughout the course, we’ll be looking at the various ways that literature (including novels, graphic novels, poetry and short stories), visual media (including photography, film, sculpture and activist art) and even video games have been enabled by and respond to oil. Then, we’ll spend the final portion of the course investigating the ways these same media have begun to address anthropogenic climate change.
ENVS 411 Perspectives on Food and Water Security
(4 cr) Syllabus Flyer
Shtob and Dreher
Human interaction with the natural environment is often experienced through our relationship to food and water. Focusing on diverse situations including drought, this course will focus on how environmental, economic, political, and social factors combine to promote or inhibit adequate access to appropriate food and water resources. Join us as we explore these issues using ideas, perspectives, and case studies developed around the world.
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership
(4 cr) Syllabus
Lynch and Boulay
*This course is part of the Environmental Leadership Program*
ENVS 450 Political Ecology
(4 cr) Syllabus
Walker
Political ecology examines the politics (in the broadest sense of the word) of the environment. Whereas environmental politics courses often focus on the role of government and interest groups in shaping specific environmental policies, political ecology expands our understanding of ‘politics’ to examine the roles of: 1) environmental rhetoric (‘discourse’), ideology, and knowledge; 2) politics and environmental change; 3) economic systems (including ‘globalization’); 4) gender-based dimensions of resource ownership and use; 5) and everyday struggles within communities and households (including ‘community’-based resource management) as they shape human relationships with nature. Although much of the political ecology literature comes from studies of the less-developed ‘third world,’ this course also examines the political ecology of the ‘first world.’
ENVS 467 Sustainable Agriculture
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
 Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.

2014-2015

Summer 2015

ENVS 199 Food Studies
(4 cr) Syllabus (June 22 – July 19)
Wooten
Description TBA
ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Science
(4 cr) Syllabus (June 22 – July 19)
Meier
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Syllabus (July 20 – August 12)
McHolm
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Syllabus (June 22 – September 6 [WEB])
Bothun
This course examines the various ways nature is represented in U.S. popular culture. What can advertisements, films, television, and popular music teach us about the ways we imagine nature and the environment? What ideas about nature are conveyed by zoos, aquariums, and nature-oriented theme parks? In this course, we will talk about what is at stake in these kinds of depictions of the natural world? We will consider how ideas about race, gender, and sexuality articulated through popular representations of nature as we explore why and how representations of nature and the environment in popular culture matter.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus (July 20 – August 12)
Bacon
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics
(4 cr) Syllabus (July 20 – August 12)
Guernsey
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice
(4 cr) Syllabus (June 22 – July 19)
Hall
The study of environmental justice is the study of environmental inequality. Environmental inequality refers to the uneven distribution of environmental burdens (such as being exposed to toxics) and benefits (like access to clean air) across space and time. This class will examine how space and place affects human and environmental well-being.By taking this course, students will develop a critical understanding of what constitutes environmental privilege and oppression by examining the historical roots of current, persistent environmental inequalities across the globe. What are the historical roots of environmental inequality? Why is it that some people are exposed to high levels of pollution or don’t have access to clean water, while others enjoy green spaces and nutritious food? Does inequality drive ecosystem degradation?Is social justice essential to, or at odds with, efforts to build a sustainable world? To answer these, and other questions affecting each of us in an ever more interconnected, and embattled, world, we’ll work together to place different kinds of texts—research articles, images, literary fiction, testimony, manifestos—into conversation with ourselves as researchers of environmental justice. We’ll examine how aspects of human identity (such as race, gender, class), history (including colonialism, development, and globalization) and nature (biogeography, animal studies) contribute to environmental inequality and tackle the ethical question of how much, if any, inequality is just in the 21st century.
ENVS 455 Sustainability
(4 cr) Syllabus (June 22 – July 19)
Walker
This course is about the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policy makers, environmentalists and businesses. The course examines the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for sustainability. A concept means that all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to help students to go beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit and rigorous thinking about sustainability that is supported by sound theory and evidence, as well as efforts to understand reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept. Prereq for 455: ENVS 201.

Spring 2015

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Dickman
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus
LeMenager
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusGuernsey
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 410 Nature in Popular Culture
(4 cr) Syllabus Flyer
Wald
This course examines the various ways nature is represented in U.S. popular culture. What can advertisements, films, television, and popular music teach us about the ways we imagine nature and the environment? What ideas about nature are conveyed by zoos, aquariums, and nature-oriented theme parks? In this course, we will talk about what is at stake in these kinds of depictions of the natural world? We will consider how ideas about race, gender, and sexuality articulated through popular representations of nature as we explore why and how representations of nature and the environment in popular culture matter.
ENVS 411 Decolonization and Environmental Justice
(4 cr) Syllabus Flyer
Bacon
Settler colonialism separates people from their sacred places, distorts the history of land-tenure, and brutalizes the ecology that upholds all life. As colonizers degrade the land, native people are often experience physical, emotional, spiritual and economic harms. In these many ways, ecological damage contributes to the ongoing genocide of native peoples. Many indigenous peoples and their supporters actively oppose ecological forms of colonial violence. Contemporary examples include the Cowboy and Indian Alliance against the Keystone XL project, international movements opposing the Tar Sands, and the work of the Two-Row Wampum Renewal Campaign.
This 411 course is designed to allow students to more fully analyze disproportionate environmental harms/benefits within the settler-colonial context (particular focus on the US and Canada because we only have 10 weeks). Students will also be introduced to the concept of decolonized research methods.
ENVS 411 Communicating Climate Change
(4 cr) Syllabus Flyer
Crayne
Despite overwhelming scientific consensus about the reality and severity of anthropogenic climate change, public knowledge and concern about the issue remains meager. Why? And what can be done? How can climate activists and educators communicate in a way that promotes public knowledge about the issue and inspires action and change? Drawing from sociology, psychology, education theory, and the humanities, this course will first examine barriers faced by climate educators and then assess a variety of real-life formal and informal educational efforts and consider how successful they are at overcoming those barriers. As a culminating project, students will work in groups to develop and implement their own vehicle to “communicate climate change” to an audience of their choosing.
ENVS 450 Political Ecology
(4 cr) Syllabus
Walker
Political ecology examines the politics (in the broadest sense of the word) of the environment. Whereas environmental politics courses often focus on the role of government and interest groups in shaping specific environmental policies, political ecology expands our understanding of ‘politics’ to examine the roles of: 1) environmental rhetoric (‘discourse’), ideology, and knowledge; 2) politics and environmental change; 3) economic systems (including ‘globalization’); 4) gender-based dimensions of resource ownership and use; 5) and everyday struggles within communities and households (including ‘community’-based resource management) as they shape human relationships with nature. Although much of the political ecology literature comes from studies of the less-developed ‘third world,’ this course also examines the political ecology of the ‘first world.’
ENVS 455 Sustainability
(4 cr) Syllabus
Walker
This course is about the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policy makers, environmentalists and businesses. The course examines the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for sustainability. A concept means that all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to help students to go beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit and rigorous thinking about sustainability that is supported by sound theory and evidence, as well as efforts to understand reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept. Prereq for 455: ENVS 201.

Winter 2015

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusBacon
This course introduces students to social science perspectives regarding some of the major environmental challenges of our time. Drawing on work from sociology, political science, geography, anthropology (and more!) this course examines the socio-political causes, as well as potential approaches to confronting and alleviating these environmental challenges.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science (4 cr) SyllabusSutherland
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 298 Food Studies(4 cr) Syllabus FlyerWooten
Food plays an integral role in our lives, socially, economically, physically and culturally. Academia has traditionally given food very little attention, but now is your chance. Learn about how individuals and communities choose and obtain food, where that food comes from, where it goes and how food systems around the world affect the environment.
ENVS 335 Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources (4 cr) SyllabusCameron
Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations.
ENVS 399 Environmental Career Opportunities (2 cr) Syllabus FlyerDreher
• Explore career opportunities available in the environmental studies and science fields
• Tailor your coursework to meet career goals and learn about graduate school options
• Develop the skills needed to secure a job
• Create a career action planPlease note: This class is intended to help freshmen, sophomores, and juniors explore the variety of careers available to Environmental Studies and Science majors. It
is not intended to address the job search and interview skills needed by seniors.
ENVS 411 Just Stories: Documenting Environmental Justice (4 cr) Syllabus FlyerChen/Baker
*This course is also part of the Environmental Leadership Program*
Every community has stories, and each person has a story to tell. But how to the stories we hear shape the way we think about ourselves? How do they color the way we relate to others? How do they inform the way we create and imagine our communities?In this course, students will spend time on both sides of the lens. We will practice craft through workshops in photography, audio, video, storyboarding and production. We will develop analytical, ethical and community-centered skills to examine what it means to witness, to document, frame and respond to an environmental justice issue.Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with Oregon communities to examine the affects of herbicides on human and ecological health.
ENVS 411 Climate Ethics (4 cr) Syllabus FlyerChristion-Myers
Given the stakes, climate change is perhaps the defining issue of our
age. How we respond (or don’t) to this issue will likely influence the
course of human existence for generations to come. But is this simply a
technological or economic problem waiting to be solved by the experts,
as most Westerners believe? Or, as many are now claiming, is this
primarily an issue of ethics and justice?
The implications of climate change throw basic assumptions about how we
live our lives and how we think into question. Perhaps no other issue
compels us to so thoroughly reexamine how we relate to nature and to
each other. Thus, as we struggle to confront the depth and gravity of
climate change, new ways of thinking and living are increasingly called
for. This course is designed to offer a variety of inter-disciplinary
perspectives and approaches to this end.
ENVS 411 Marine Dead Zones (4 cr) Syllabus FlyerRommwatt
Marine dead zones are increasing globally and often linked to human activity. This course will explore the connections between environmental regulation, pollution, and marine ecology through an in-depth look at marine dead zones. Specifically, we will study the dead zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico and the issues surrounding it. This will inclue non-point source pollution in the Mississippi River and the law and policy related to this form of pollution, marine eutrophication and how it can lead to dead zones, the marine ecology of dead zones themselves, and how dead zones are and could affect fishing communities.
ENVS 411 Ecological Restoration (4 cr) SyllabusBoulay
*This course is part of the Environmental Leadership Program*
Ecological restoration is a relatively new – but rapidly growing – interdisciplinary field of applied study. It is the science and art of attempting to recover the ecological function of ecosystems degraded by human activity. During this course, students will apply ecological theory to restoration practice, learn about underlying causes that damage ecological integrity, consider how people intervene to address these causes, and explore some of the scientific, economic and philosophical bases of restoration ecology. We will examine the entire process of restoration: assessment, planning, implementation, maintenance, monitoring and communicating results. We will use local case studies and field investigations to explore some of the goals, methods, challenges, successes, failures and other lessons learned. This course is a required element of the Environmental Leadership Program’s Conservation Science in Action projects.
ENVS 425 Environmental Education (4 cr) SyllabusLynch
*This course is part of the Environmental Leadership Program*
In-depth examination of environmental education in theory and practice. Topics include learning theories, environmental literacy, and how to successfully plan, implement and evaluate educational programs. We will also examine how EE is practiced in Oregon, nationally and around the globe. A major focus is the group project, in which you will work in collaboration with a community partner to help develop EE materials.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice (4 cr) SyllabusNorgaard
How and why are environmental problems experienced differently according to raced, gender and class? How do different communities experience and respond to environmental problems? Why does it matter that there is unequal exposure to environmental risks and benefits? What do we learn about the meaning of gender, race and class by studying the patterns of exposure and creative resistance of different communities to environmental hazards? In other words, what does the study of environmental risks tell us about racism, classism, sexism in our nations and world today? What is environmental privilege and why does it matter? These are some of the questions we will take up in this course.
ENVS 467 Sustainable Agriculture (4 cr) SyllabusMartin
Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.

Fall 2014

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
(4 cr) Syllabus
Schreiner
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) SyllabusToadvine
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 298 Environmental Accountability and Data Visualization
(4 cr) Syllabus
Bothun
This course is designed to show how various environmental issues can be objectively framed in data aspects and how effective environmental policy can occur when the data view of the issue takes precedence over the anecdotal view. This course will also demonstrate that the gigantic effort underway to monitor emission space, land use changes, consumption patterns, transportation habits, etc, makes it possible for very accurate monitoring and subsequent accountability if this data can be made accessible to the policy world. That is the central role of data visualization – how do you represent a complex problem in an accessible format that promotes immediate understanding of the scale of the problem. This latter aspect of the course becomes possible now, given the very large and relatively easy to use open source software (OSS) visualization tools (e.g. the google playground).
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusToadvine
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 350 Ecology of Energy Generation (4 cr) SyllabusBothun
Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation, including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.
ENVS 411 Food Systems (4 cr) Course Flyer SyllabusGooch/Moore
Join us to map and explore the emerging social movement towards sustainable and just food systems. Prepare for leadership roles through critical thinking and meaningful, active engagement with hands on food projects. Read about agroecology, social systems, food justice and food politics while you intern with local community partners, and investigate the complex and diverse nature of food systems from the ground up. Looking forward to a fun semester of food!
ENVS 411 Edges (4 cr) Course FlyerRoberts
The edge of a forest, especially at twilight, inspires curiosity, confusion, and study in cultures all over the world, beginning with folk stories of mystical tricksters and now including the debates of ecologists. This course is a transdisciplinary study of environmental edges, the culture created by them and constructing them, and the practical applications of their study. Through this course, students will gain a holistic understanding of “edges” as well as training in professional and academic applications of such transdisciplinary and immersive study.
ENVS 411 Tribal Climate Change (4 cr) Course Flyer SyllabusLynn
This course will give an in depth examination of the impacts of climate change on tribal culture and sovereignty in the United States, and exploration the role of traditional ecological knowledge in understanding climate change impacts and solutions, and climate justice.
ENVS 477 Soil Science (4 cr) SyllabusYeo
This course will introduce students to the wonderful world of soils that exist, often
forgotten, beneath our feet. Soils are one of the most fundamental ecological constraints
on patterns and processes such as plant distribution, nutrient cycling, and cycling of water between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Soils are also an important
component of many current and historical environmental problems.

2013-2014

Summer 2014

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Science (4 cr) June 23 – July 20Meier/Hall
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) June 23 – July 20 Course Flyer
Hall
This course is a survey of the contribution of natural sciences to the study of the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Natural sciences provide powerful tools for describing and understanding environmental issues, as well as a means for evaluating policy decisions that impact the human and more-than-human environment. Theoretical and topical perspectives covered in the course include ecology, climatology, environmental health and toxicology, environmental history, and citizen science. In a society which privileges specialized, scientific knowledge, how does a non-scientist comprehend and engage meaningfully in environmental discussions? This course is part of the three term core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for Environmental Studies (but not Environmental Science) majors (and must be taken for a grade). It is an introductory course, designed for first-years and sophomores, and satisfies university general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. ENVS 201, 202, 203 may be taken in any order.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Online Course June 23 – September 7
Bothun
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use..
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) July 21 – Aug 13
McHolm
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics
(4 cr) July 21 – Aug 13
Guernsey
Key concepts and various moral views surveyed; includes anthropocentrism, individualism, ecocentrism, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Exploration includes case studies and theory.
ENVS 411 Law & Environment
(4 cr) July 21 – Aug 13 Flyer
Crider
This course provides students with an understanding of laws that regulate the environment as well as the skills to analyze and apply these laws to current issues. By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate with agencies, lawyers, businesses and individuals about environmental laws and determine how and whether to use legal tools to resolve environmental issues. Topics include the structure and operation of the legal system, the development of environmental laws, policy issues and risk assessment, federal and state laws applicable to habitat and species protection, air quality, water quality, toxic substances, solid and hazardous waste, energy production, government agency regulation and enforcement, citizen and public enforcement, and international environmental law.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice
(4 cr) June 23 – July 20 Flyer Syllabus
Bacon
Environmental justice and its impact on current decisions. Focus on civil rights law, perception of risk, and relation of sustainability and equity.
ENVS 455 Sustainability
(4 cr) June 23 – July 20 Syllabus
Walker
Examines the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policymakers, environmentalists, and businesses.

Spring 2014

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Syllabus Course Flyer Syllabus
Sutherland
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use..
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus
Toadvine
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 375 Oregon Seminar (4 cr) SyllabusRoy
The goal of this seminar is to broaden and deepen your understanding of the natural and cultural history of Oregon through directed readings. In this seminar we will establish together a learning community, based on respect, cooperation, and constructive critical exchange. As controversial issues arise, it is essential that we respect each other, expressing ourselves clearly, courteously, and concisely, in ways that open up, rather than close down, conversation and promote learning. Each meeting will be guided by a set of key themes and problems, or questions, and will require that you complete and think carefully about the assigned readings. To promote critical thinking and enhance discussion, each week you will be required to write a short essay or paper (approximately 500 words) in response to a question. These papers should help to focus your thoughts and enable you to take an informed and active role in class discussion.
ENVS 409 Food Field Notes – Course Flyer
(4 cr) Syllabus
Van Pelt
Production of Food Field Notes. Students create and perform assignments, write/edit stories, take photos, all for the food studies webzine. Stories can range from academic research articles, to in-depth journalistic interviews. to short documentary videos about food topics.
ENVS 411 Home and Environment – Course Flyer
(4 cr) Syllabus
Eaton & Peach
Join two New Hampshire carpenters in exploration of small-scale residential shelter, for those with a desire to live in a meaningful, and “sustainable” place of residence. We will strive to answer the question: What makes home? We will approach this central question from practical (hands-on!) and abstract vantage points, with an explicit concern for environmental impacts, while paying close attention to the human subject, processes of home making, materials, technology, and cost. This course will address basic architectural concepts, but is designed to aid any occupant, and in particular, the aspiring homemaker. The course is designed as a collaborative, feedback-oriented endeavor, in exploration of the relationship of home and the environment. Expect to emerge from this experience as an informed resident, with an awareness of the energy that the home embodies and exudes.
ENVS 411 Imagining the Environment of Tomorrow – Course Flyer
(4 cr) Syllabus
Hall
What does the future have in store for Earth—for us? Have we reached the end of nature? Do we only have to keep Earth functional long enough to make a light-speed leap into the cosmos and boldly go to a galaxy far, far away, or are we on the verge of a great bottleneck disaster, leading to a grim post-apocalyptic pastoral occupied by the occasional mutant toiling in the radioactive dust?Our “environmental imaginations” are determined in part by our vision of what the future holds. Environmentalist movements have often been mobilized against time. We’ll explore the ways in which we imagine the past, present, and future by critically and creatively reading a variety of historical and contemporary cultural ‘texts’ such as literary fiction, essays, films, news coverage, advertisements, and public policy. By using these texts as a cipher for environmentalist aspirations and anxieties in American culture from the 19th century to the present, we’ll explore the opportunities and limits imposed by different rhetorics of crisis, calamity, utopia, and dystopia that construct environmental problems and our sense of future worlds. These topics demand that we creatively interrogate how we ourselves “predict the future” in an increasingly unpredictable world of climate change, new technologies (plus biotechnologies), expanding markets, and growing human population.
ENVS 477 Soil Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Marshall
This course will introduce students to the wonderful world of soils that exist, often
forgotten, beneath our feet. Soils are one of the most fundamental ecological constraints
on patterns and processes such as plant distribution, nutrient cycling, and cycling of water
between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Soils are also an important
component of many current and historical environmental problems.

Winter 2014

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusLynn
Environmental Studies 201 introduces some of the major environmental challenges of our time, with a focus on social science perspectives on the causes of and solutions to these challenges. Many of the issues in course readings are recognizable in everyday media, such as climate change, environmental justice, hydraulic fracturing, coal trains, sustainability, and transportation and housing choice, among others. The course will examine environmental problems, and the ways in which they are not just “environmental” but human, social and economic. The course will explore solutions that individuals, public agencies, companies or communities may pursue by themselves, as well as solutions that require collective action, and the scales at which different solutions take place. The course provides a mix of readings, some focused on global challenges and others focused on national, regional or local concerns. .
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science (4 cr) SyllabusDickman
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 335 Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources (4 cr) SyllabusCameron
Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations.
ENVS 399 Environmental Movements of the Global North and South (4 cr) SyllabusNorgaard
The environmental movement is one of the most successful social movements that has ever taken place, literally reshaping many aspects of popular culture, academic disciplines and government policy. With the stakes so high, it had better be! What is the history of the U.S. environmental movements? How do environmental movements differ around the world? How do privilege, race, gender and class as well as global position shape the reasons people have for engaging in movements? What kinds of tactics are used to create social change? What does it feel like to engage in activism? Why do people persist even when the odds of success seem small? These are some of the questions we will take up in the next ten weeks together. This course will be highly reading and discussion intensive. We will read classics and new material and work both inside and outside the classroom. In particular, we are very fortunate that the largest public interest environmental law conference in the country is held annually here in Eugene Oregon, as well as a one time only conference at Oregon State University. You will have an opportunity to earn extra credit by participating in these phenomenal occasions as ideas, issues and information from the conference will compliment and contribute to our class.
ENVS 411 Climate Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusChristion-Myers
Given the stakes, climate change is perhaps the defining issue of our age. How we respond (or don’t) to this issue will likely influence the course of human existence for generations to come. But is this simply a technological or economic problem waiting to be solved by the experts, as most Westerners believe? Or, as many are now claiming, is this primarily an issue of ethics and justice?The implications of climate change throw basic assumptions about how we live our lives and how we think into question. Perhaps no other issue compels us to so thoroughly reexamine how we relate to nature and to each other. Thus, as we struggle to confront the depth and gravity of climate change, new ways of thinking and living are increasingly called for. This course is designed to offer a variety of inter-disciplinary perspectives and approaches to this end.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice (4 cr) SyllabusNorgaard
How and why are environmental problems experienced differently according to raced, gender and class? How do different communities experience and respond to environmental problems? Why does it matter that there is unequal exposure to environmental risks and benefits? What do we learn about the meaning of gender, race and class by studying the patterns of exposure and creative resistance of different communities to environmental hazards? In other words, what does the study of environmental risks tell us about racism, classism, sexism in our nations and world today? What is environmental privilege and why does it matter? These are some of the questions we will take up in this course.
ENVS 465 Wetland Ecology/Management (4 cr) SyllabusBridgham
This is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate course that examines management and policy issues relating to wetlands, while providing enough scientific background to understand these issues. The course is divided into three parts (see syllabus). The first section includes an overview of cultural perceptions of wetlands and how these have changed through time, a general description of different types of wetlands, and then a more in-depth discussion of jurisdictional wetland definitions, classification schemes, wetland distributions globally and in the U.S., and current and historical wetland loss rates. The middle section is an introduction to wetland ecology and includes factors controlling their formation and development over time on the landscape, an introduction to hydrology as it pertains to wetlands, hydric soils, and plant community ecology. It focuses on the three main criteria for most definitions of wetlands: hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation. The last part of the course returns in more depth to the management and policy issues that were introduced in the beginning of the term. We will discuss wetland laws and policy in Oregon, the U.S., and globally, mapping and delineation of wetlands, and wetland restoration and creation.
ENVS 467 Sustainable Agriculture (4 cr) SyllabusMartin
Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.

Fall 2013

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) SyllabusSchreiner
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusChristion Myers
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 350 Ecological Energy Generation (4 cr) SyllabusBothun
Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation, including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.
ENVS 411 Food Systems (4 cr) SyllabusHavlik/Nebert
A plethora of popular films and books have documented the environmental and social problems inherent in the industrial agri-food system; however, much of the discourse is centered on policies and regulations on the national scale. While these are valid and necessary critiques, they tend to overlook fundamental insights from a bottom-up systems perspective. Our course, then, will work to map food systems from the ground up. Through readings on agroecology, social systems, food justice, and governance, students will become familiar with the various, interrelated perspectives that set the groundwork of our food system. Students will apply these perspectives by participating in an interdisciplinary team project directed toward creative problem-solving of issues in our local food system.
ENVS 411 Understanding Places: The McKenzie Watershed
(4 cr) Syllabus
Boulay/Lynch
In this class you will learn about this amazing river and the people who shape its health, management and future, explore a beautiful and fascinating landscape, and discover the source of your drinking water. We will examine the geological, ecological, historical, social, and political influences within the McKenzie watershed. Fieldtrips will take us from the headwaters to confluence. We’ll hike to Great Springs, tour a farm or fish hatchery, visit a restoration project and more — to explore the various
perspectives on water use, dam management, salmon restoration and land use. And you will engage with the community through a hands-on project.
ENVS 411 Tribal Climate Change (4 cr) Course Flier SyllabusLynn
This course will give an in depth examination of the impacts of climate change on tribal culture and sovereignty in the United States, and exploration the role of traditional ecological knowledge in understanding climate change impacts and solutions, and climate justice. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
ENVS 455 Sustainability What Is It? (4 cr)Walker
This course is about the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policy makers, environmentalist and businesses. Prereq for 455: ENVS 201.

2012-2013

Summer 2013

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
(4 cr) June 24 – July 21 Syllabus
Grigsby
Contributions of social sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include human population; relations between social institutions and environmental problems; and associated historical, political, legal, policy and economic processes.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr) June 24 – July 21 Syllabus Course FlierHall
Contributions of the natural sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include biological processes, ecological principles, chemical cycling, ecosystem characteristics, and natural system vulnerability and recovery.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr) Online Course SyllabusBothun
Contributions of the natural sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include biological processes, ecological principles, chemical cycling, ecosystem characteristics, and natural system vulnerability and recovery.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) July 22 – Aug 14 SyllabusChristion Myers
Contributions of the humanities and arts to understandings of the environment. Emphasis on diverse ways of thinking, writing, creating, and engaging in environmental discourse.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) June 24 – July 21SyllabusGuernsey
Key concepts and various moral views surveyed; includes anthropocentrism, individualism, ecocentrism, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Exploration includes case studies and theory.
ENVS 411/511 Topic: Law and the Environment (4 cr) July 22 – Aug 14 SyllabusCrider
This course provides students with an understanding of laws that regulate the environment as well as the skills to analyze and apply these laws to current issues. By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate with agencies, lawyers, businesses and individuals about environmental laws and determine how and whether to use legal tools to resolve environmental issues. Topics include the structure and operation of the legal system, the development of environmental laws, policy issues and risk assessment, federal and state laws applicable to habitat and species protection, air quality, water quality, toxic substances, solid and hazardous waste, energy production, government agency regulation and enforcement, citizen and public enforcement, and international environmental law.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice (4 cr) July 22 – Aug 14 SyllabusBacon
Environmental justice and its impact on current decisions. Focus on civil rights law, perception of risk, and relation of sustainability and equity. Prereq: ENVS 201
ENVS 455 Sustainability (4 cr) June 24 – July 21Walker
Examines the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policymakers, environmentalists, and businesses.
Pre- or coreq: ENVS 201

Spring 2013

ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) SyllabusWestling
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 350 Ecological Footprint of Energy Generation (4 cr) SyllabusBothun
The current ecological footpring of our energy and electricity generation takes the primary form of dumping waste heat into the surface layers of the ocean. In turn that leads to climate changes if that excess heat can’t be mixed rapidly. The oceans are currently near there satuation point which means that the rate of climate change is accelerating If we want to decarbonize the grid and move to sustainable energy sources then we must acknowledge that the biggest evil is CLIMATE CHANGE. All forms of alternative energy genreation will have an ecological footprint – we must choose against the lesser of all evils. There is no other choice for us. The silver bullet solution does not exit. It especially doesn’t exist if we can’t curb global Consumption.
ENVS 411 Topic: Hanford: Environmental Issues in West (4 cr) SyllabusElliott
In the early 1940’s, the Mid-Columbia Basin was already the site of historical and environmental change brought about by white settlement. In 1943, the Hanford nuclear site was established as part of the Manhattan Project, and it produced the plutonium used to drop a bomb on Nagasaki. Today, Hanford is the site of the largest environmental cleanup project in history—it is now a Superfund site that receives $2 billion in government funding each year.
In this class, we will explore the environmental and social impacts associated with the Hanford site, as well as other environmental issues affecting the area and the American West as a whole. By taking an in-depth look at a specific place, we will learn how environmental issues are intertwined, as well as how they are replicated in other places.
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership: (Project) (1-4 cr)
EE Sylabus
CSA SyllabusCE Syllabus
Lynch/Boulay
This class is the first quarter of the Environmental Leadership Program’s two-quarter Environmental Education Initiative. During this winter we will explore various progressive educational theories and see how environmental education is practiced in Oregon, nationally and around the globe. You will work in teams to apply your skills, strengths and creativity towards developing educational materials that will make a difference in our community and wider world.This year the teams and community partners are:
Canopy Connection (Lynch)
X-Stream (Lynch)
River Stories (Lynch)
Stream Stewardship (Boulay)
Wetland Wildlife (Boulay)
Oregon Oaks (Boulay)ENVS 467 Sustainable Agriculture (4 cr)MartinExamines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.
ENVS 450 Political Ecology (4 cr)Walker
Political ecology examines the politics (in the broadest sense of the word) of the environment. Whereas environmental politics courses often focus on the role of government and interest groups in shaping specific environmental policies, political ecology expands our understanding of ‘politics’ to examine the roles of: 1) environmental rhetoric (‘discourse’), ideology, and knowledge; 2) politics and environmental change; 3) economic systems (including ‘globalization’); 4) gender-based dimensions of resource ownership and use; 5) and everyday struggles within communities and households (including ‘community’-based resource management) as they shape human relationships with nature. Although much of the political ecology literature comes from studies of the less-developed ‘third world,’ this course also examines the political ecology of the ‘first world.’

Winter 2013

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusMartin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusDickman
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 335 Allocation of Scarce Environmental Resources (4 cr)Cameron
Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations.
ENVS 410 River Stories (4 cr) SyllabusLynch
Assist in documenting and archiving the rich cultural history of the McKenzie River and develop a public installation to share this history with the public.
ENVS 411 Environmental Action in the Americas (4 cr) SyllabusVeazey
This course will discuss the recent history of environmental concern and action within social movements in North, Central and South America, highlighting the connections between environmental action and social justice, development, democracy and international relations issues. We will critically examine the tensions between environmental narratives and practices and between grassroots movements and institutions.
ENVS 411 Foreign Aid, Development, and the Global South (4 cr) Course Flier SyllabusGrigsby
In this course, we will discuss conventional and alternative theories of development that inspire and direct the agendas of international development assistance (aid) agencies. In particular, we will evaluate the impacts of the dominant development paradigm on the ecological systems and citizens of the Global South. We will use readings from prominent development theorists and Southern activists to debate the merits of collective action in resisting development and the ways in which Northern environmentalists can more effectively assist in combating global environmental degradation. This course will specifically rely on examples of development projects and collective action in sub-Saharan Africa.
ENVS 425 Environmental Education: Theory & Practice (4 cr) SyllabusLynch
In-depth examination of environmental education in theory and practice. Topics include learning theories, environmental literacy, and how to successfully plan, implement and evaluate educational programs. We will also examine how EE is practiced in Oregon, nationally and around the globe. A major focus is the group project, in which you will work in collaboration with a community partner to help develop EE materials.
ENVS 427 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (4 cr) SyllabusBoulay
An introduction to the theory, techniques, and practice of environmental and ecological monitoring designed to ground students in the data collection, analysis, and presentation methods; local case studies. Lectures, laboratories, field trips. Calculus of statistics recommended.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice (4 cr) SyllabusNorgaard
How and why are environmental problems experienced differently according to raced, gender and class? How do different communities experience and respond to environmental problems? Why does it matter that there is unequal exposure to environmental risks and benefits? What do we learn about the meaning of gender, race and class by studying the patterns of exposure and creative resistance of different communities to environmental hazards? In other words, what does the study of environmental risks tell us about racism, classism, sexism in our nations and world today? What is environmental privilege and why does it matter? These are some of the questions we will take up in this course.
ENVS 440 Environmental Aesthetics (4 cr) Course Flier SyllabusToadvine
Explores aesthetic experience of nature through philosophical perspective; emphasizes nature and art; beauty and the sublime; embodiment, culture, and science; and ethics, conservation, and preservation.

Fall 2012

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusMartin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) SyllabusMcGill
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345: Environmental Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusMorar
Imagine yourself in the following situation: you are in a room where you can press a button that says “if you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away”. What philosophical/ethical reasons would you have to refrain from pressing that button? Are there any such reasons? Is it morally wrong to destroy something we (humans) deem beautiful? Some philosophers believe that there is no moral value without a valuator. So, what if you were the last person on Earth and you would not care about the Grand Canyon, would it still be wrong to press the button? And even if you were not the last person, would it suffice to appeal to the idea that you might deprive future generations from experiencing such ineffable scenery? Imagine the button says, “it you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away, but in doing so, you save x human lives.” How many lives would justify blowing away the Grand Canyon? What if those lives are the lives of some people you will never know/meet with? Does it have to be a human life? What about a non-human animal life? What about an ecosystem? This course will attempt to answer some of the questions above and to conceptualize central notions in environmental ethics. We will focus on defining what it means to have moral standing or to be a (moral) person. Is this concept coextensive with the set of human beings? How far can/should we extend the borders of our moral community? And ultimately, why should I really care about the environment? What does make environmental issues genuine moral issues?
ENVS 355 Environmental Data Analysis and Modeling (4 cr)Bothun
Statistical methods of data modeling and analysis with specific application to environmental data sets.
ENVS 411: Understanding Place: the McKenzie Watershed
(4 cr)
Boulay/Lynch
In this class you will learn about this amazing river and the people who shape its health, management and future, explore a beautiful and fascinating landscape, and discover the source of your drinking water. We will examine the geological, ecological, historical, social, and political influences within the McKenzie watershed. Fieldtrips will take us from the headwaters to confluence. We’ll hike to Great Springs, tour a farm or fish hatchery, visit a restoration project and more — to explore the various
perspectives on water use, dam management, salmon restoration and land use. And you will engage with the community through a hands-on project.
ENVS 411 Environmental Problems in China (4 cr) SyllabusBonady / Linde
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the greatest environmental concerns in China today. We will investigate air, land, and water issues throughout the five regions of China and examine solutions and activism that are rising to tackle these problems. We will familiarize ourselves with China’s geography and the political, historical, and social context of environmental issues before delving into case studies.
Course topics include soil erosion and deforestation, coal mining, dams, glacial melt, and water pollution. We will draw connections to parallel issues and movements in the U.S. Each student will develop a regional focus for a regional report, case study paper, and final presentation. In-class time will include film clips, some mini-lectures and presentations, and discussions. Active student participation is encouraged.
ENVS 411 Communicating Environmental Issues through Theater and Film (4 cr) SyllabusSky/Toth
In this course, we will explore how theater and film can help communicate environmental and science issues, promote action, and drive change.
Students will learn about how environmental science and policy are presented on stage and in film while also actively critiquing and engaging with these tools, asking if and how they can inspire positive environmental action.
In addition to viewing some of the most powerful environmental films out today and analyzing different theater styles, students will also be given opportunities to create their own work and collaborate with their peers. The course will culminate in a final project which emphasizes real action and impact.
This course will also be rich in discussion, activity, and opportunities for outside-the-box thinking. We encourage students from all fields with all backgrounds to enroll. (No theater or film experience necessary.)
ENVS 411 Top Law & Environment (4 cr) SyllabusCrider
In depth examination of a particular environmental topic such as global warming, ecosystem restoration, energy alternatives, geothermal development, public lands management, or environmental literature. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
ENVS 455 Sustainability (4 cr) SyllabusWalker
After 20 years in the public spotlight, the concept of “sustainability” has arguably become the dominant framework for understanding environmental challenges today. Yet, this term is so widely used to describe such greatly differing ideas and practices (with only loose – or even contradictory – definitions) that some have questioned whether this term means anything at all. Is sustainability just a fuzzy (if appealing) buzzword? Those who have attempted to define sustainability have in some cases come to wholly incompatible conclusions about its meaning– such as vigorous and ongoing debates between certain economists and ecologists over whether economic growth is compatible with sustaining ecological systems.A careful examination of the competing definitions of sustainability reveals disagreements about core social, cultural, and ecological assumptions, such as: what is to be sustained (economic growth? ecosystems ‘services’? ecosystems and species independent of their economic value?); who is to benefit (humans alive today? which humans? future generations? what about other species?); whose values (or ‘needs’) are to be sustained? (Is American consumer culture a ‘need’? can materially wealthy societies deny similar aspirations to others in a rapidly globalizing culture and economy?); and what time frame is appropriate? (A short time frame may make ‘sustainability’ too easy, whereas in the face of today’s rapid ecological and technological change a long time frame may make sustaining current conditions impossible, or even undesirable). In short, an examination of ‘sustainability’ is nothing less than of an examination of what we desire to be as a society, what values and cultures we prioritize, how we understand our biophysical interactions with the planet, and what ethical obligations we have.The course then ‘unpacks’ the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for ‘sustainability’. A concept that means all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to enable students to move beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit definitions and efforts to understand and reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept of sustainability. This is a ‘tough love’ course for sustainability: by examining this important concept with a highly critical eye, students will be better positioned to move sustainability forward with more rigorous definitions and goals that are ecologically sound, socially effective, ethically and culturally defensible, and technologically achievable.
ENVS 477 Soil Science (4 cr) SyllabusMarshall
Chemical and physical characteristics and classification of soils, field soil identification, soil degradation.

2011-2012

Summer 2012

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr)Elliott
Contributions of social sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include human population; relations between social institutions and environmental problems; and associated historical, political, legal, policy and economic processes.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr) WEBBothun
Online course. Contributions of the natural sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include biological processes, ecological principles, chemical cycling, ecosystem characteristics, and natural system vulnerability and recovery.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr)Hall
Contributions of the humanities and arts to understandings of the environment. Emphasis on diverse ways of thinking, writing, creating, and engaging in environmental discourse.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr)Christion Myers
Key concepts and various moral views surveyed; includes anthropocentrism, individualism, ecocentrism, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Exploration includes case studies and theory.
ENVS 345 411/511 Topic: Sustainable Agriculture (4 cr) SyllabusMartin
Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.
ENVS 455/555 Sustainability (4 cr)Walker
After 20 years in the public spotlight, the concept of “sustainability” has arguably become the dominant framework for understanding environmental challenges today. Yet, this term is so widely used to describe such greatly differing ideas and practices (with only loose – or even contradictory – definitions) that some have questioned whether this term means anything at all. Is sustainability just a fuzzy (if appealing) buzzword? Those who have attempted to define sustainability have in some cases come to wholly incompatible conclusions about its meaning– such as vigorous and ongoing debates between certain economists and ecologists over whether economic growth is compatible with sustaining ecological systems. A careful examination of the competing definitions of sustainability reveals disagreements about core social, cultural, and ecological assumptions, such as: what is to be sustained (economic growth? ecosystems ‘services’? ecosystems and species independent of their economic value?); who is to benefit (humans alive today? which humans? future generations? what about other species?); whose values (or ‘needs’) are to be sustained? (Is American consumer culture a ‘need’? can materially wealthy societies deny similar aspirations to others in a rapidly globalizing culture and economy?); and what time frame is appropriate? (A short time frame may make ‘sustainability’ too easy, whereas in the face of today’s rapid ecological and technological change a long time frame may make sustaining current conditions impossible, or even undesirable). In short, an examination of ‘sustainability’ is nothing less than of an examination of what we desire to be as a society, what values and cultures we prioritize, how we understand our biophysical interactions with the planet, and what ethical obligations we have. The course then ‘unpacks’ the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for ‘sustainability’. A concept that means all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to enable students to move beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit definitions and efforts to understand and reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept of sustainability. This is a ‘tough love’ course for sustainability: by examining this important concept with a highly critical eye, students will be better positioned to move sustainability forward with more rigorous definitions and goals that are ecologically sound, socially effective, ethically and culturally defensible, and technologically achievable.

Spring 2012

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusMason
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) SyllabusToadvine
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. 
ENVS 411 Envrionmental Action in the Americas SyllabusVeazey
This course will discuss the recent history of environmental concern and action within social movements in North and South America, highlighting the historic connections between environmental conflicts with social justice, development, democracy and international relations issues.
ENVS 411 Topic: Envir. Conservation and Restoration in the Pacific Northwest (4 cr) SyllabusKnapp
This course will explore restoration and conservation in the Pacific Northwest, focusing on four themes – why, where, and how restoration and conservation take place, and who does restoration and conservation.  We will examine reasons why people conserve and restore – ranging from ethics to aesthetics and from human health to economic and biological reasons. We will also examine where conservation and restoration take place. How do we decide what areas should be priorities for conservation and restoration? We will explore issues of scale on conservation and restoration and explore how people engage in conservation and restoration at multiple scales – from the regional conservation planning perspective to the determination of what should be conserved and restored on a single property.
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership: (Project) (1-4 cr)
Syllabus CSA Teams
Syllabus EE Teams
Lynch/Boulay
Second segment in the 2-term commitment. Students develop service-learning projects partnering with government agencies, nonprofit organizations, public schools, and local businesses. Prereq: instructor’s approval. Repeat (R) when topic changes.The 2011-2012 teams and community partners are:
Canopy Connection/ H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest & the Pacific Tree Climbing Institute (Lynch)Native Naturalists/ Mt. Pisgah Arboretum (Lynch)Exploring Ethnobotany/ Adams Elementary School (Lynch)Restoration Research/ West Eugene Wetlands (Boulay)Sustainable Farms/ Eugene Water & Electric Board, Cascade Pacific Resource Conservation & Development, and McKenzie River Trust (Boulay)Stream Stewardship/ McKenzie and/or Middle Fork Willamette Watershed Councils (Boulay)
ENVS 411/511 Topic: Sustainable Agriculture (4 cr) SyllabusMartin
Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.

Winter 2012

ENVS 201 Introductions to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusIngalsbee
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences
(4 cr) Syllabus
Sutherland
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors.
ENVS 335 Allocation of Scarce Environmental Resources (4 cr) SyllabusCameron
Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusChristion – Myers
Key concepts and various moral views surveyed; includes anthropocentrism, individualism, ecocentrism, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Exploration includes case studies and theory.
ENVS 350 Energy Footprint (4 cr)Bothun
Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation, including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.
ENVS 407 Environmental Studies Theory and Practice (2 cr) SyllabusDickman
See Syllabus.
ENVS 411 Topic: Communicating Environmental Issues with Theatre
(4 cr) Syllabus
Toth/Roddy
See Syllabus.
ENVS 411 Topic: Pollution and Health (4 cr) SyllabusNienaber
What are major sources of pollution?  Where are they concentrated?  How bad are they, really? This course is an investigation of the relationship between pollution and human health.  We will examine: various forms of pollution, common health problems associated with them, the history of pollution, policy and technological methods to try to reduce negative health consequences, as well as environmental justice concerns related to pollution.  This will be accomplished through lecture, discussion of scientific studies, independent research, and in-class activities.
ENVS 425/525 Environmental Education: Theory & Practice (4 cr) SyllabusLynch
In-depth examination of environmental education in theory and practice. Topics include learning theories, environmental literacy, and how to successfully plan, implement and evaluate educational programs. We will also examine how EE is practiced in Oregon, nationally and around the globe. A major focus is the group project, in which you will work in collaboration with a community partner to help develop EE materials.
ENVS 427 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (4 cr) SyllabusBoulay
An introduction to the theory, techniques, and practice of environmental and ecological monitoring designed to ground students in the data collection, analysis, and presentation methods; local case studies. Lectures, laboratories, field trips. Calculus or statistics recommended.
ENVS 435/535 Environmental Justice (4 cr) SyllabusNorgaard
Environmental justice and its impact on current decisions. Focus on civil rights law, perception of risk, and relation of sustainability and equity. Prereq: ENVS 201.
ENVS 465/565 Wetland Ecology and Management (4 cr) SyllabusBridgham
Examines management, law, and policies related to wetlands in an ecological framework; includes wetland type definitions, classification, distribution, formation and development, and restoration.

Fall 2011

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) SyllabusMartin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) SyllabusMason
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) SyllabusMorar
Imagine yourself in the following situation: you are in a room where you can press a button that says “if you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away”. What philosophical/ethical reasons would you have to refrain from pressing that button? Are there any such reasons? Is it morally wrong to destroy something we (humans) deem beautiful? Some philosophers believe that there is no moral value without a valuator. So, what if you were the last person on Earth and you would not care about the Grand Canyon, would it still be wrong to press the button? And even if you were not the last person, would it suffice to appeal to the idea that you might deprive future generations from experiencing such ineffable scenery? Imagine the button says, “it you press it, the Grand Canyon will be blown away, but in doing so, you save x human lives.” How many lives would justify blowing away the Grand Canyon? What if those lives are the lives of some people you will never know/meet with? Does it have to be a human life? What about a non-human animal life? What about an ecosystem? This course will attempt to answer some of the questions above and to conceptualize central notions in environmental ethics. We will focus on defining what it means to have moral standing or to be a (moral) person. Is this concept coextensive with the set of human beings? How far can/should we extend the borders of our moral community? And ultimately, why should I really care about the environment? What does make environmental issues genuine moral issues? (See course flyer for more details)
ENVS 410/510 Soil Science (4 cr) SyllabusBridgham
Chemical and physical characteristics and classification of soils, field soil identification, soil degradation.
ENVS 411 Topic: Environmental Action in the Americas (4 cr) SyllabusVeazey/Rivera
This course will discuss the recent history of environmental concern and action within social movements in North and South America, highlighting the historic connections between environmental conflicts with social justice, development, democracy and international relations issues. (See course flyer for more details)
ENVS 411 Topic: Northwest Ethnobotany (4 cr) SyllabusBonady/Lynch
This class will examine people/plant relationships in the Pacific Northwest. We will explore how biodiversity of forest and other ecosystems is being tapped to promote both conservation and rural economic development. We will investigate the complex economics, multi-faceted politics, and diverse cultural traditions associated with non-timber forest products. We will look at the ancient gathering practices of Native Americans, the introduced plants and traditions of immigrants, and the emerging practices of people seeking to reconnect with the natural world. (See course flyer for more details)
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership: (Project) (1-4R cr) SyllabusBoulay
This is a one term service learning course in which a community-based project will be implemented and leadership, collaboration and communications skills will be developed.
ENVS 411/511 Topic: Law and the Environment (4 cr) SyllabusCrider
This course provides students with an understanding of laws that regulate the environment as well as the skills to analyze and apply these laws to current issues. By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate with agencies, lawyers, businesses and individuals about environmental laws and determine how and whether to use legal tools to resolve environmental issues. Topics include the structure and operation of the legal system, the development of environmental laws, policy issues and risk assessment, federal and state laws applicable to habitat and species protection, air quality, water quality, toxic substances, solid and hazardous waste, energy production, government agency regulation and enforcement, citizen and public enforcement, and international environmental law. (See course flyer for more details)
ENVS 455/555 Sustainability What is it? (4 cr)Walker
After 20 years in the public spotlight, the concept of “sustainability” has arguably become the dominant framework for understanding environmental challenges today. Yet, this term is so widely used to describe such greatly differing ideas and practices (with only loose – or even contradictory – definitions) that some have questioned whether this term means anything at all. Is sustainability just a fuzzy (if appealing) buzzword? Those who have attempted to define sustainability have in some cases come to wholly incompatible conclusions about its meaning– such as vigorous and ongoing debates between certain economists and ecologists over whether economic growth is compatible with sustaining ecological systems. A careful examination of the competing definitions of sustainability reveals disagreements about core social, cultural, and ecological assumptions, such as: what is to be sustained (economic growth? ecosystems ‘services’? ecosystems and species independent of their economic value?); who is to benefit (humans alive today? which humans? future generations? what about other species?); whose values (or ‘needs’) are to be sustained? (Is American consumer culture a ‘need’? can materially wealthy societies deny similar aspirations to others in a rapidly globalizing culture and economy?); and what time frame is appropriate? (A short time frame may make ‘sustainability’ too easy, whereas in the face of today’s rapid ecological and technological change a long time frame may make sustaining current conditions impossible, or even undesirable). In short, an examination of ‘sustainability’ is nothing less than of an examination of what we desire to be as a society, what values and cultures we prioritize, how we understand our biophysical interactions with the planet, and what ethical obligations we have. The course then ‘unpacks’ the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for ‘sustainability’. A concept that means all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to enable students to move beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit definitions and efforts to understand and reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept of sustainability. This is a ‘tough love’ course for sustainability: by examining this important concept with a highly critical eye, students will be better positioned to move sustainability forward with more rigorous definitions and goals that are ecologically sound, socially effective, ethically and culturally defensible, and technologically achievable.

2010-2011

Summer 2011

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 credits)

Instructor: Veazey

This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr)

Instructor: Bothun

This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use. (Summer 2011 – WEB)

ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities

Instructor: Bacon

This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements — deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism — for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.

ENVS 411 Topic: The Hanford Site

Instructor: Elliott

Pending description

ENVS 411 Topic: Climate Justice

Instructor: Joshi

Pending description

ENVS 411/511 Topic: Sustainable Agriculture

Instructor: Martin

Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.

ENVS 455/555 Sustainability

Instructor: Walker

After 20 years in the public spotlight, the concept of “sustainability” has arguably become the dominant framework for understanding environmental challenges today. Yet, this term is so widely used to describe such greatly differing ideas and practices (with only loose – or even contradictory – definitions) that some have questioned whether this term means anything at all. Is sustainability just a fuzzy (if appealing) buzzword? Those who have attempted to define sustainability have in some cases come to wholly incompatible conclusions about its meaning– such as vigorous and ongoing debates between certain economists and ecologists over whether economic growth is compatible with sustaining ecological systems. A careful examination of the competing definitions of sustainability reveals disagreements about core social, cultural, and ecological assumptions, such as: what is to be sustained (economic growth? ecosystems ‘services’? ecosystems and species independent of their economic value?); who is to benefit (humans alive today? which humans? future generations? what about other species?); whose values (or ‘needs’) are to be sustained? (Is American consumer culture a ‘need’? can materially wealthy societies deny similar aspirations to others in a rapidly globalizing culture and economy?); and what time frame is appropriate? (A short time frame may make ‘sustainability’ too easy, whereas in the face of today’s rapid ecological and technological change a long time frame may make sustaining current conditions impossible, or even undesirable). In short, an examination of ‘sustainability’ is nothing less than of an examination of what we desire to be as a society, what values and cultures we prioritize, how we understand our biophysical interactions with the planet, and what ethical obligations we have. The course then ‘unpacks’ the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for ‘sustainability’. A concept that means all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to enable students to move beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit definitions and efforts to understand and reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept of sustainability. This is a ‘tough love’ course for sustainability: by examining this important concept with a highly critical eye, students will be better positioned to move sustainability forward with more rigorous definitions and goals that are ecologically sound, socially effective, ethically and culturally defensible, and technologically achievable.

Spring 2011

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 credits)

Instructor: Schreiner

This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis. (Spring)

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental: Natural Sciences (4 credits)

Instructor: Dickman

This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use. (Winter)

ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 credits)

Instructor: Carruth

This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements — deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism — for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. (Spring)

ENVS 350 Energy Footprint (4 cr)

Instructor: Bothun

Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation, including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.

ENVS 399 Seminar: Natural and Cultural History (4 credits)

Instructor: Dennis, Roering, Roy

(Pending course description)

ENVS 411 Living in a Toxic World (4 credits)

Instructor: Elliot

(Pending course description) (Spring)

ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership: (Project) (1-4R cr)

Instructor: Lynch/Boulay

Second segment in the 2-term commitment. Students develop service-learning projects partnering with government agencies, nonprofit organizations, public schools, and local businesses. Prereq: instructor’s approval. Repeat (R) when topic changes.

  • Canopy Connection (Lynch)
  • Climate Ethics/Equity (Lynch)
  • Wetlands (Lynch)
  • Restoration (Boulay)
  • Turtles (Boulay)

Winter 2011

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental: Natural Sciences (4 credits)

Instructor: Dickman

This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.

ENVS 335 Allocation Scarce Environmental Resources (4 credits)

Instructor: Cameron

Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations

ENVS 411 Ecology & the Economy (4 credits)

Instructor: Horan

(Pending course description)

ENVS 411 Pollution & Health (4 credits)

Instructor: Nienaber

What are major sources of pollution?  Where are they concentrated?  How bad are they, really? This course is an investigation of the relationship between pollution and human health.  We will examine: various forms of pollution, common health problems associated with them, the history of pollution, policy and technological methods to try to reduce negative health consequences, as well as environmental justice concerns related to pollution.  This will be accomplished through lecture, discussion of scientific studies, independent research, and in-class activities.

ENVS 411/511 Sustainable Agriculture (4 credits)

Instructor: Martin

Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability. (Winter)

ENVS 425/525 Environmental Education: Theory & Practice (4 credits)

Instructor: Lynch

In-depth examination of environmental education in theory and practice. Topics include learning theories, environmental literacy, and how to successfully plan, implement and evaluate educational programs. We will also examine how EE is practiced in Oregon, nationally and around the globe. A major focus is the group project, in which you will work in collaboration with a community partner to help develop EE materials.

ENVS 427/527 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (4 credits)

Instructor: Boulay

Environmental and ecological monitoring is done for a variety of reasons, and the monitoring objectives will shape the project design and methods. In this course, you will examine the entire process of designing and implementing a monitoring program. Using local monitoring projects as case studies, you will use common techniques to collect, manage, analyze, summarize and present data. You will gain practical hands-on experience using a variety of equipment and software resources. Course topics focus on plant and animal population monitoring but will also address monitoring for habitat restoration, water quality, and other topics. Because monitoring relies on models for predicting outcomes and statistics for analyzing data, some background in mathematics and statistics is recommended for this course.

ENVS 450/550 Political Ecology (4 credits)

Instructor: Walker

Political ecology examines the politics (in the broadest sense of the word) of the environment. Whereas environmental politics courses often focus on the role of government and interest groups in shaping specific environmental policies, political ecology expands our understanding of ‘politics’ to examine the roles of:

  1. environmental rhetoric (‘discourse’), ideology, and knowledge;
  2. politics and environmental change;
  3. economic systems (including ‘globalization’);
  4. gender-based dimensions of resource ownership and use;
  5. and everyday struggles within communities and households (including ‘community’-based resource management) as they shape human relationships with nature. Although much of the political ecology literature comes from studies of the less-developed ‘third world,’ this course also examines the political ecology of the ‘first world.’

Fall 2010

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 credits)

Instructor: Walker

This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.

ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 credits)

Instructor: Elliott/Mason

This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements — deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism — for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.

ENVS 355 Environmental Data Analysis and Modeling (4 credits)

Instructor: Bothun

Statistical methods of data modeling and analysis with specific application to environmental data sets.

ENVS 411 Topic: Communication (4 credits)

Instructor: Roddy/Peacher

Pending description

ENVS 411 Law and the Environment (4 credits)

Instructor: Crider

This course provides students with an understanding of laws that regulate the environment as well as the skills to analyze and apply these laws to current issues. By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate with agencies, lawyers, businesses and individuals about environmental laws and determine how and whether to use legal tools to resolve environmental issues. Topics include the structure and operation of the legal system, the development of environmental laws, policy issues and risk assessment, federal and state laws applicable to habitat and species protection, air quality, water quality, toxic substances, solid and hazardous waste, energy production, government agency regulation and enforcement, citizen and public enforcement, and international environmental law.

ENVS 410/510 Soils (4 credits)

Instructor: Bridgham

Chemical and physical characteristics and classification of soils, field soil identification, soil degradation.

ENVS 429 Ecotourism

Instructor: Boulay

Pending description

ENVS 455/555 Sustainability What is it? (4 credits)

Instructor: Walker

After 20 years in the public spotlight, the concept of «sustainability» has arguably become the dominant framework for understanding environmental challenges today. Yet, this term is so widely used to describe such greatly differing ideas and practices (with only loose — or even contradictory — definitions) that some have questioned whether this term means anything at all. Is sustainability just a fuzzy (if appealing) buzzword? Those who have attempted to define sustainability have in some cases come to wholly incompatible conclusions about its meaning— such as vigorous and ongoing debates between certain economists and ecologists over whether economic growth is compatible with sustaining ecological systems.

A careful examination of the competing definitions of sustainability reveals disagreements about core social, cultural, and ecological assumptions, such as: what is to be sustained (economic growth? ecosystems ’services’? ecosystems and species independent of their economic value?); who is to benefit (humans alive today? which humans? future generations? what about other species?); whose values (or ’needs’) are to be sustained? (is American consumer culture a ’need’? can materially wealthy societies deny similar aspirations to others in a rapidly globalizing culture and economy?); and what time frame is appropriate? (a short time frame may make ’sustainability’ too easy, whereas in the face of today’s rapid ecological and technological change a long time frame may make sustaining current conditions impossible, or even undesirable). In short, an examination of ’sustainability’ is nothing less than of an examination of what we desire to be as a society, what values and cultures we prioritize, how we understand our biophysical interactions with the planet, and what ethical obligations we have.

This course is about the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policy makers, environmentalist and businesses. The course then ’unpacks’ the competing social, cultural, economic, and ecological assumptions and priorities that are often quietly but powerfully promoted in the push for ’sustainability’. A concept that means all things to all people can too easily come to mean little or nothing. The purpose of this course is to enable students to move beyond fuzzy buzzwords by critically examining these multiple meanings and encouraging more explicit definitions and efforts to understand and reconcile the ambiguities, tensions, and contradictions in the concept of sustainability. This is a ’tough love’ course for sustainability: by examining this important concept with a highly critical eye, students will be better positioned to move sustainability forward with more rigorous definitions and goals that are ecologically sound, socially effective, ethically and culturally defensible, and technologically achievable.

Prereq: ENVS 201 and junior or senior standing.