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Spring 2022 Projects

2021-22 ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

Applications due Monday, 11/1/21, 9:00 am – Apply Now!

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PROJECTS

All EE projects require you to complete a district background check and submit proof of Covid vaccination. Project details subject to change due to changes in state, county, district and/or UO Covid rules.

Aves Compartidas 2022. This team will work in partnership with the Willamette-Laja Twinning Project and River Road Elementary School to bring students together from Mexico and the US to learn about the migratory birds we share. Using birds as our focal point, we will explore our ecological and cultural connections.  Your mission will be to: “unite youth, educators, habitat restoration practitioners and the birding community for deep cultural connections and sustained conservation of our shared migratory species and habitats.” Previous experience birding and/or Spanish is useful, but not required. In winter you will enroll in ENVS 425: Environmental Education: Theory & Practice (4 credits), and in Spring ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits).

Climate Science, Climate Justice 2022. This team will engage middle-schoolers in learning about old-growth forests, climate science, and climate justice. Your mission will be to show science in action and engage students in an interdisciplinary exploration of climate issues.  You’ll implement new lessons developed at HJA as well as develop one of your own.  The team will visit classrooms and lead full day field trips to the Andrews Forest in spring term (if Covid-guidelines allow).  You’ll be working in partnership with the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. A background in ecology, climate science and/or climate justice is helpful, but not required. In winter you will enroll in ENVS 425: Environmental Ed: Theory & Practice (4 credits), and in Spring ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits).

Restoring Connections 2022. Get out onto the trails at Mt. Pisgah Arboretum with elementary school children to help them cultivate a lasting, personal connection to nature, based on reciprocity and respect. This year we’ll be working with K-3rd grade and focused on plants and people. Activities will focus on Coyote Mentoring methods such as journaling, with a focus on native flora, fauna, and natural history. You will gain experience in the development and implementation of hands-on learning experiences. You’ll be working in partnership with MPA and Adams Elementary School. In winter you will enroll in ENVS 425: Environmental Education: Theory & Practice (4 credits), and in Spring ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits).

CONSERVATION SCIENCE PROJECTS

Promoting Pollinators 2022. With the overall goals of providing shade for Goose Creek and habitat for pollinators within the context of an organic farm (Whitewater Ranch), this team will continue maintaining and monitoring a riparian restoration project as well as monitor a new pollinator planting intended to help the farm’s pollinator populations recover from the September 2020 Holiday Farm Fire. This is a continuation of our long-term “Riparian Restoration” project with a greater emphasis on pollinators. This project will build upon the 2014-2021 teams’ work. You will learn about riparian restoration techniques and challenges, pollinator conservation and a variety of monitoring methods. A background in botany, pollination biology, sustainable agriculture or ecological restoration is useful but not required. In winter, you will enroll in ENVS 427: Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (4 credits), and in Spring ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits).

NEW! Birds and Blooms. Only 1% of the Willamette Valley’s historical wet prairie habitats remain. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Long Tom Watershed Council are in the process of restoring wet prairie and vernal pool habitat at Coyote Creek South to benefit at-risk species such as Streaked Horned Lark and Red-legged Frog. This project will monitor plant and animal occurrence following restoration and will include the use of iNaturalist, a community science platform. You will learn about prairie restoration techniques and challenges, grassland bird conservation and a variety of monitoring methods. A knowledge of conservation biology, avian conservation, ecological restoration, or botany is preferred but not required. In winter, you will enroll in ENVS 427: Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (4 credits), and in Spring ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits).

NEW! Fire and Fuels. Burning by the Kalapuya peoples maintained a mosaic of oak and prairie habitats in the Willamette Valley. Since colonization by European settlers, fire suppression has led to habitat loss and degradation, as well as fuel buildup rendering forests more prone to catastrophic wildfires. However, restoration of oak communities can improve wildlife habitat and serve as a firebreak in the wildland-urban interface. This project will monitor and assess fuel loads, vegetative response to ecological burns and/or oak habitats. You will learn about the benefits and challenges of fire and oak management, as well as vegetation/fuels monitoring methods. A knowledge of forest biology or botany is preferred but not required. In winter, you will enroll in ENVS 427: Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (4 credits), and in Spring ENVS 429: ELP (4 credits).