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March 24, 2017

UO Today Interview with Erin Moore!

Erin Moore is an Associate Professor in Environmental Studies and Architecture. Her work explores architecture in the context of environmental ethics, fossil fuel consumption, carbon sequestration, and climate change. Watch her interview with UO Today here.

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March 20, 2017

UO Today Interviews ENVS program director Richard York!

Watch Richard York’s interview with UO Today here!

Richard York

 

 

 

Congrats to our Faculty!

Congratulations to all our faculty who have won awards this year!

 

-Brendan AAHljdivBohannan (Biology) was recently elected to the American Academy of Microbiology Fellows.

-Kory Russell (Landscape Architecture),
Peter Walker (Geography), and Nicolae Morar (Philosophy) have each received the 2017 Faculty Research Award from the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation.

Finally, Ronald Mitchell (Political Science) is one of three recipients of the 2016-2017 Tykeson Teaching Award.  The award annually recognizes one exceptional faculty member in each of the three CAS divisions.

 

 

 

March 19, 2017

Featured Faculty: Ronald Mitchell

picture-145-f76b3ed1510dae8c0891fce680679941Political Science and Environmental Studies professor Ronald Mitchell is one of three faculty recipients of the 2017 Tykeson Teaching Award for excellence in education.

Mitchell’s research focuses on understanding international environmental treaties and which factors make some treaties more “effective” than others in getting countries to practice environmental protection. His interests include both researching the minutiae of specific treaties and how they are designed and implemented, as well as broader patterns and data on efficacy that emerge from examining hundreds of environmental treaties and protocols that different countries have signed. His inspiration for the work stems from an awareness of the environmental harm that humankind has historically wrought at the personal, local, national, and international level and the sustaining hope that providing his students with proper research skills might contribute to mitigating human-caused environmental damage in future.

For Mitchell, there is an indelible link between research and teaching. As he describes it, reading the works of other researchers broadens his understanding of issues related to treaties, and conducting his own research requires “active, careful, and rigorous thinking about these issues”. But, effective teaching requires identifying ways to communicate his own knowledge clearly and succinctly, which in turn deepens his own understanding of the topic. Thus, research and teaching are part of an “iterative” and mutually reinforcing process.

However, one of best parts about serving this dual role is the ability to bring students into the research process. Here, Mitchell puts it best himself:

“One of the great pleasures of being a faculty member who cares about teaching and research comes from inviting students to do research with me.  Over 25 years of teaching at UO, I have invited over 75 undergraduate and graduate students to help me build a database of all international environmental agreements. Those students have helped create a database that now provides the most comprehensive list of international environmental treaties in the world.  The most rewarding part of involving students in my research, however, has been the deep friendships that develop through the mentoring process. Students I have worked with have gone on to excellent graduate schools and/or positions in government, nongovernmental organizations, and universities. These students, and my close relationships with them, inspire me by their extraordinary commitment to helping protect the environment that we live in and are a part of.”

If you are interested in learning more about Mitchell’s work, links to his video lectures can be found here; or read his book International Politics and the Environment (Sage, 2010).

For more information about international environmental treaties, visit the International Environmental Agreements Database Project.

 

March 6, 2017

Join Us for the Final Brown Bag of the Term!

An ENVS lunch seminar is scheduled for Wednesday, March 8th from 12:00-1:30pm, COL 249 (lunch is served).picture-15
For our last winter event, Kirby Brown (English, UO) will be presenting a talk called, “From Standing Rock to the Klamath: Nationhood, Sovereignty, Story, and Place.”
February 15, 2017

TWO Upcoming Book Readings

ENVS is co-sponsoring two book readings with the English Department, the English Department Diversity Committee, and the Ethnic Studies Department. Priscilla Ybarra will be reading from her book Writing the Goodlife: Mexican Americans and the Environment on March 1st at 4:00 PM.

Sarah Wald will be reading from her book The Nature of California: Race, Citizenship, and Farming since the Dustbowl, followed by a response from Sarah YbarraRayWaldPosterJaquette Ray, on March 2nd at 4:00 PM. Both readings will take place in the Knight Library Browsing Room.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 19, 2017

Environmental Games Talk

Mark your calendars! ENVS is co-sponsoring this upcoming talk on environmental video games:

“The Problem of Modeling (and Rendering) Trees” with Alenda Chang

keywords_uo_nature_changCan you commune with nature in a video game? The rise of so-called “walking simulator” games suggests that you can, even as games remain undertheorized as environmental systems. Ranging from first-person walkers, to plant modeling software and asset libraries, to gestural terraforming in virtual reality, this presentation will outline just a few of the ways in which the environmental humanities can contribute to the future of game studies.

ALENDA Y. CHANG is an Assistant Professor in Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. With a multidisciplinary background in biology, literature, and film, she specializes in merging ecocritical theory with the analysis of contemporary media. Her writing has recently been featured in _Ant Spider Bee_, _Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment_, and _Qui Parle_, and her current book project develops ecological frameworks for understanding and designing digital games. She also maintains the _Growing Games_ blog as a resource for researchers in game and ecomedia studies and the environmental humanities.

Her talk will take place on February 22, 2017 from 4:00 – 5:30 pm in EMU 023, Lease Crutcher Lewis Room.

Join Us for Environmental Connect!

Are you looking for an internship or a volunteer opportunity? Environmental Connect is just for you!

Join us on Wednesday, February 22nd from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm in the EMU Crater Lake Room to network with local businesses, municipalities, and non-profit organizations. Food and refreshments provided!PowerPoint Presentation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 15, 2017

NEW: Winter Brown Bag Seminar Series Schedule (say that 3 times fast)

Tayltaylor-225x300or McHolm (ABD – English & ENVS) will be presenting on his dissertation research: “Inverting Albedo: Reflections on and in the Anthropocene”, Jan 19th, 12:00-1:30pm, COL 249. Lunch will be provided.

 

 

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Ben Hale, an environmental philosopher at UC Boulder, the president of the International Society for Environmental Ethics, and the editor of Ethics, Policy and the Environment, will be giving two talks at UO. The first is: “E-waste and the Lingering Value of Technological Artifacts”, Feb 1st, 12:00-1:30pm, COL 249. 
His second talk, open to ENVS majors, will be based on his recent book “The Wild and The Wicked: On Nature and Human Nature” (MIT Press 2016). Also Feb 1st, 4:00-5:30pm, COL 142.

 

 

Kirby Brown (English, UO), “TBA”*, March 8th, 12:00-1:30pm, COL 249picture-15

 

 

 

*Updates will be given when available.
December 19, 2016

UPDATE: NEW Cash Prize*, and Ecotone 2017 Submission Deadline has been Extended!!

Ecotone_Call_For_Submissions-extended_deadlineThe Ecotone: The Journal of Environmental Studies at University of Oregon is soliciting submissions for our 2017 issue. The Ecotone is the annual interdisciplinary journal produced by the graduate students of Environmental Studies.

Graduate students and faculty in any department are invited to submit work for review. Submissions may include fiction, non-fiction, academic writing, poetry, journalism, photography, film, media reviews, and visual art. Undergraduates are invited to workshop their submissions through our Undergrad Writing Mentorship Program to improve their pieces before submitting.

This year’s theme is “Movement and Resistance”. Submissions not related to the theme will also be considered.

The deadline for all submissions is HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO 5:00 PM on ***FEBRUARY 15, 2017***. Email questions and submissions to Erin Crnkovich at ecotoneuofo@gmail.com.

In your submission, please include your full name, year, and department/program.

***Additionally, there will be a cash prize for the best undergraduate submission.***

 

December 1, 2016

Save the Date! An Upcoming Lecture

Alenda Chang will be speaking on her work on environment and video games at 4pm on Wednesday, February 22nd. Her talk is entitled keywords_uo_speaker-series-1.  Location TBA.

Alenda Y. Chang is an Assistant Professor in Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. With a multidisciplinary background in biology, literature, and film, she specializes in merging ecocritical theory with the analysis of contemporary media. Her writing has recently been featured in Ant Spider Bee, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, and Qui Parle, and her current book project develops ecological frameworks for understanding and designing digital games. She also maintains the Growing Games blog as a resource for researchers in game and ecomedia studies and the environmental humanities.

November 17, 2016

NEW: Publication Jointly Developed by the Forest Service and the Tribal Change Project

A growing body of literature examines the vulnerability, risk, resilience, and adaptation of indigenous peoples to climate change. This synthesis of literature, entitled Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples: A Synthesis of Current Impacts and Experiences, brings together research pertaining to the impacts of climate change on sovereignty, culture, health, and economies that are currently being experienced by Alaska Native and American Indian tribes and other indigenous communities in the United States. The knowledge and science of how climate change impacts are affecting indigenous peoples contributes to the development of policies, plans, and programs for adapting to climate change and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This report defines and describes the key frameworks that inform indigenous understandings of climate change impacts and pathways for adaptation and mitigation, namely, tribal sovereignty and self-determination, culture and cultural
identity, and indigenous community health indicators. It also provides a comprehensive synthesis of climate knowledge, science, and strategies that indigenous communities are exploring, as well as an understanding of the gaps in research on these issues. This literature synthesis is intended to make a contribution to future efforts such as the 4th National Climate Assessment, while serving as a resource for future research, tribal and agency climate initiatives, and policy development.

To read the report, click here.

October 22, 2016

UPDATED: Fall Brown Bag Seminar Series

Our first seminar of the term will be given by Michael Nelson. Michael Nelson is an environmental scholar, writer, teacher, speaker, consultant, and professor of environmental ethics and philosophy. He holds the Ruth H. Spaniol Chair of Renewable Resources in the Department of Forest Ecosystems & img_4356Society at Oregon State and serves as the Lead Principal Investigator for the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research program.

Topic: How Shall We Live with Wolves?: Findings at the Edge of Ecology, Ethics, and Social Science. Date and Location: October 25, 2016,  12:00-1:30 PM in Cedar & Spruce Rooms in the EMU.

 

 

Our second seminar will be presented by David Hughes. Professor David McDermott Hughes has taught at Rutgers University since 2000 – first in the Department of Human Ecology and then the Department of Anthropology. He earned his PhD in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley, having conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Zimbabwe and Mozambique.  Ensuing from that training his first two books concerned race, natural resources, and land reform in Southern Africa (From Enslavement to Environmentalism, 2006, and Whiteness in Zimbabwe, 2010). Politics drove him out of Zimbabwe and to the petro-state of Trinidad and Tobago.  Hughes is now publishing a monograph on the oil industry and responsibility for climate change (Energy without Conscience, 2017).  He has also begun fieldwork in Spain on labor, aesthetics, clean energy, and utopian thought.  At Rutgers, Hughes has directed the Center for African Studies and the undergraduate program in the Department of Anthropology.  Currently, he serves as president of the Rutgers AAUP-AFT faculty union.

Topic: Wind Turbine Utopia: Leisure, Labor, and Clean Energy. Date and Location: October 27, 2016, 12:00-1:30 PM in Columbia 249 (Lunch will be served) 

 

 

The final seminar in the series will be presented by Shane Hall*. Shane is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oregon (ENVS and English).shane

Topic: War by Other Means: Environmental Violence in the 21st Century

Date and Location: December 1, 2016, 12:00-1:30 PM in the Spruce Room (EMU)

 

 

 

 

*Taylor McHolm’s presentation, Inverting Albedo: Reflections on and in the Anthropocene, has been moved to January 19th 12:00-1:30pm in COL 249. 

 

October 19, 2016

Paul Bannick Comes to U of O

paulbannickposter

The Environmental Studies Program – along with the Lane County Audubon Society, Cascades Raptor Center and UO Environmental & Natural Resources Law Center – is pleased to present a stunning multi-media presentation by photographer Paul Bannick:  Tuesday, Oct 25, 7:30, 100 Willamette Hall.

October 12, 2016

2016 Ecotone is HERE!

2016-ecotone-coverIt’s here! The 2016 Ecotone has arrived, carrying on another year of tradition here at the UO Environmental Studies Program. Each year, ENVS graduate students, undergraduates, and faculty come together to produce this creative literary publication, and every issue is full of unique surprises and thought-provoking insights into the world around us.

Please stop by the office to pick up your very own hard copy, or check it out online here!

A huge thanks again to everyone who made it possible!

Featured Faculty: Lucas Silva

Lucas Silva“Solving puzzles as part of an interdisciplinary team has been a consistent source inspiration for me,” says Lucas Silva. “The transdisciplinary collaborative spirit observed through campus, and particularly salient in my home departments (ENVS & Geography), is the single most important factor that drew me to UO.” Indeed, Silva exemplifies this spirit of interdisciplinarity through his work and contributions to academia.  (more…)

September 8, 2016

The 2016 Ecotone is on its way!

ecotone-2016-coming-soon-slideGet ready… the Ecotone 2016 is on its way and will be released just in time for Fall term! Some things to look forward to in this year’s edition:

  • Brilliant photography by our very own ENVS students
  • Thought-provoking poetry
  • Original artwork
  • Editor’s choice summer reading list
  • In-depth essays and articles
  • And possibly a perplexing puzzle to get your gears turning — so get ready to put on your thinking caps!

We are very excited to present this year’s issue of the Ecotone and can’t wait to distribute it to readers, donors, and supporters of the Environmental Studies Program. Keep an eye out on the website for updates on the 2016 release!

 

May 26, 2016

2016 Environmental Studies Commencement Info

If you are planning to graduate Spring 2016 (this term), Summer 2016, or Fall 2016, we invite you to participate in the 2016 commencement ceremonies to be held Monday, June 13th.

The main ceremony will be held at 9:00a.m. in Matthew Knight Arena. Tickets are not required for the event, and seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Students and faculty will gather in front of Johnson Hall at 8:15a.m. in regalia. At 8:45a.m., the UO Duck Grad Parade will start down 13th Avenue to the arena. Additional information regarding participation in this ceremony is available online: http://commencement.uoregon.edu/ (more…)

May 20, 2016

Kathy Lynn featured in Oregon Quarterly

lynnEnvironmental Studies professor Kathy Lynn has been featured in the most recent issue of Oregon Quarterly, the flagship magazine of the University of Oregon. The article, A World Aflame, tells the story of Lynn’s founding of the Tribal Climate Change Project and how it explores the effects of climate change on Northwest Tribes. (more…)

April 20, 2016

NEW Spring Schedule for Brown Bag Seminar Series 

Sarah WaldThis term, our seminar series will open with a celebration of our own faculty. Beginning with Sarah Wald (ENVS & English) for the recent publication of her book, The Nature of California: Race, Citizenship, and Farming since the Dust Bowl, she has generously agreed to give a talk for our program (more…)

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