Undergraduate Courses

Environmental Studies Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Please note that the following lists only include descriptions of courses with the ENVS prefix. Please consult the UO Class Schedule and the UO Catalog for other course options.

FALL 2013
WINTER 2014
SPRING 2014
SUMMER 2014
FALL 2014


 

 FALL 2013

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) Syllabus Schreiner
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) Syllabus Christion Myers
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 350 Ecological Energy Generation (4 cr) Syllabus Bothun
Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation, including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.
ENVS 411 Food Systems (4 cr) Havlik/Nebert
A plethora of popular films and books have documented the environmental and social problems inherent in the industrial agri-food system; however, much of the discourse is centered on policies and regulations on the national scale. While these are valid and necessary critiques, they tend to overlook fundamental insights from a bottom-up systems perspective. Our course, then, will work to map food systems from the ground up. Through readings on agroecology, social systems, food justice, and governance, students will become familiar with the various, interrelated perspectives that set the groundwork of our food system. Students will apply these perspectives by participating in an interdisciplinary team project directed toward creative problem-solving of issues in our local food system.
ENVS 411 Understanding Places: The McKenzie Watershed (4 cr) Boulay/Lynch
In this class you will learn about this amazing river and the people who shape its health, management and future, explore a beautiful and fascinating landscape, and discover the source of your drinking water. We will examine the geological, ecological, historical, social, and political influences within the McKenzie watershed. Fieldtrips will take us from the headwaters to confluence. We’ll hike to Great Springs, tour a farm or fish hatchery, visit a restoration project and more — to explore the various
perspectives on water use, dam management, salmon restoration and land use. And you will engage with the community through a hands-on project.
ENVS 411 Tribal Climate Change (4 cr) Course Flier Lynn
This course will give an in depth examination of the impacts of climate change on tribal culture and sovereignty in the United States, and exploration the role of traditional ecological knowledge in understanding climate change impacts and solutions, and climate justice. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
ENVS 455 Sustainability What Is It? (4 cr) Walker
This course is about the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policy makers, environmentalist and businesses. Prereq for 455: ENVS 201.

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Winter 2014

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) Syllabus Lynn
Environmental Studies 201 introduces some of the major environmental challenges of our time, with a focus on social science perspectives on the causes of and solutions to these challenges. Many of the issues in course readings are recognizable in everyday media, such as climate change, environmental justice, hydraulic fracturing, coal trains, sustainability, and transportation and housing choice, among others. The course will examine environmental problems, and the ways in which they are not just “environmental” but human, social and economic. The course will explore solutions that individuals, public agencies, companies or communities may pursue by themselves, as well as solutions that require collective action, and the scales at which different solutions take place. The course provides a mix of readings, some focused on global challenges and others focused on national, regional or local concerns. .
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science (4 cr) Syllabus Dickman
 This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use.
ENVS 335 Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources (4 cr) Syllabus Cameron
Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations.
ENVS 399 Environmental Movements of the Global North and South (4 cr) Syllabus Norgaard
 The environmental movement is one of the most successful social movements that has ever taken place, literally reshaping many aspects of popular culture, academic disciplines and government policy. With the stakes so high, it had better be! What is the history of the U.S. environmental movements? How do environmental movements differ around the world? How do privilege, race, gender and class as well as global position shape the reasons people have for engaging in movements? What kinds of tactics are used to create social change? What does it feel like to engage in activism? Why do people persist even when the odds of success seem small? These are some of the questions we will take up in the next ten weeks together. This course will be highly reading and discussion intensive. We will read classics and new material and work both inside and outside the classroom. In particular, we are very fortunate that the largest public interest environmental law conference in the country is held annually here in Eugene Oregon, as well as a one time only conference at Oregon State University. You will have an opportunity to earn extra credit by participating in these phenomenal occasions as ideas, issues and information from the conference will compliment and contribute to our class.
ENVS 411 Climate Ethics (4 cr) Syllabus Christion-Myers
 Given the stakes, climate change is perhaps the defining issue of our age. How we respond (or don’t) to this issue will likely influence the course of human existence for generations to come. But is this simply a technological or economic problem waiting to be solved by the experts, as most Westerners believe? Or, as many are now claiming, is this primarily an issue of ethics and justice?The implications of climate change throw basic assumptions about how we live our lives and how we think into question. Perhaps no other issue compels us to so thoroughly reexamine how we relate to nature and to each other. Thus, as we struggle to confront the depth and gravity of climate change, new ways of thinking and living are increasingly called for. This course is designed to offer a variety of inter-disciplinary perspectives and approaches to this end.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice (4 cr) Syllabus Norgaard
 How and why are environmental problems experienced differently according to raced, gender and class? How do different communities experience and respond to environmental problems? Why does it matter that there is unequal exposure to environmental risks and benefits? What do we learn about the meaning of gender, race and class by studying the patterns of exposure and creative resistance of different communities to environmental hazards? In other words, what does the study of environmental risks tell us about racism, classism, sexism in our nations and world today? What is environmental privilege and why does it matter? These are some of the questions we will take up in this course.
ENVS 465 Wetland Ecology/Management (4 cr) Syllabus Bridgham
This is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate course that examines management and policy issues relating to wetlands, while providing enough scientific background to understand these issues.  The course is divided into three parts (see syllabus).  The first section includes an overview of cultural perceptions of wetlands and how these have changed through time, a general description of different types of wetlands, and then a more in-depth discussion of jurisdictional wetland definitions, classification schemes, wetland distributions globally and in the U.S., and current and historical wetland loss rates.  The middle section is an introduction to wetland ecology and includes factors controlling their formation and development over time on the landscape, an introduction to hydrology as it pertains to wetlands, hydric soils, and plant community ecology.  It focuses on the three main criteria for most definitions of wetlands:  hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation.  The last part of the course returns in more depth to the management and policy issues that were introduced in the beginning of the term.  We will discuss wetland laws and policy in Oregon, the U.S., and globally, mapping and delineation of wetlands, and wetland restoration and creation.
ENVS 467 Sustainable Agriculture (4 cr) Syllabus Martin
 Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability.

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Spring 2014

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Syllabus Course Flyer
Sutherland
 This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use..
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) Syllabus
Toadvine
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 375 Oregon Seminar (4 cr) Syllabus Roy
The goal of this seminar is to broaden and deepen your understanding of the natural and cultural history of Oregon through directed readings. In this seminar we will establish together a learning community, based on respect, cooperation, and constructive critical exchange.  As controversial issues arise, it is essential that we respect each other, expressing ourselves clearly, courteously, and concisely, in ways that open up, rather than close down, conversation and promote learning.  Each meeting will be guided by a set of key themes and problems, or questions, and will require that you complete and think carefully about the assigned readings. To promote critical thinking and enhance discussion, each week you will be required to write a short essay or paper (approximately 500 words) in response to a question.  These papers should help to focus your thoughts and enable you to take an informed and active role in class discussion.
ENVS 409 Food Field Notes – Course Flyer
(4 cr) Syllabus
Van Pelt
Production of Food Field Notes. Students create and perform assignments, write/edit stories, take photos, all for the food studies webzine. Stories can range from academic research articles, to in-depth journalistic interviews. to short documentary videos about food topics.
ENVS 411 What Makes Home – Course Flyer
(4 cr) Syllabus
Eaton & Peach
Join two New Hampshire carpenters in exploration of small-scale residential shelter, for those with a desire to live in a meaningful, and “sustainable” place of residence. We will strive to answer the question: What makes home? We will approach this central question from practical (hands-on!) and abstract vantage points, with an explicit concern for environmental impacts, while paying close attention to the human subject, processes of home making, materials, technology, and cost. This course will address basic architectural concepts, but is designed to aid any occupant, and in particular, the aspiring homemaker. The course is designed as a collaborative, feedback-oriented endeavor, in exploration of the relationship of home and the environment. Expect to emerge from this experience as an informed resident, with an awareness of the energy that the home embodies and exudes.
ENVS 411 Imagining the Environment of Tomorrow – Course Flyer
(4 cr) Syllabus
Hall
What does the future have in store for Earth—for us? Have we reached the end of nature? Do we only have to keep Earth functional long enough to make a light-speed leap into the cosmos and boldly go to a galaxy far, far away, or are we on the verge of a great bottleneck disaster, leading to a grim post-apocalyptic pastoral occupied by the occasional mutant toiling in the radioactive dust?Our “environmental imaginations” are determined in part by our vision of what the future holds. Environmentalist movements have often been mobilized against time. We’ll explore the ways in which we imagine the past, present, and future by critically and creatively reading a variety of historical and contemporary cultural ‘texts’ such as literary fiction, essays, films, news coverage, advertisements, and public policy. By using these texts as a cipher for environmentalist aspirations and anxieties in American culture from the 19th century to the present, we’ll explore the opportunities and limits imposed by different rhetorics of crisis, calamity, utopia, and dystopia that construct environmental problems and our sense of future worlds. These topics demand that we creatively interrogate how we ourselves “predict the future” in an increasingly unpredictable world of climate change, new technologies (plus biotechnologies), expanding markets, and growing human population.
ENVS 477 Soil Science
(4 cr) Syllabus
Marshall
This course will introduce students to the wonderful world of soils that exist, often
forgotten, beneath our feet. Soils are one of the most fundamental ecological constraints
on patterns and processes such as plant distribution, nutrient cycling, and cycling of water
between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Soils are also an important
component of many current and historical environmental problems.

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Summer 2014

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Science (4 cr) June 23 – July 20 Meier/Hall
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) June 23 – July 20 Course Flyer
Hall
This course is a survey of the contribution of natural sciences to the study of the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Natural sciences provide powerful tools for describing and understanding environmental issues, as well as a means for evaluating policy decisions that impact the human and more-than-human environment. Theoretical and topical perspectives covered in the course include ecology, climatology, environmental health and toxicology, environmental history, and citizen science. In a society which privileges specialized, scientific knowledge, how does a non-scientist comprehend and engage meaningfully in environmental discussions? This course is part of the three term core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for Environmental Studies (but not Environmental Science) majors (and must be taken for a grade). It is an introductory course, designed for first-years and sophomores, and satisfies university general education breadth requirements for natural sciences.  ENVS 201, 202, 203 may be taken in any order.
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Science
(4 cr) Online Course June 23 – September 7
Bothun
This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use..
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities
(4 cr) July 21 – Aug 13
McHolm
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics
(4 cr) July 21 – Aug 13
Guernsey
Key concepts and various moral views surveyed; includes anthropocentrism, individualism, ecocentrism, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Exploration includes case studies and theory.
ENVS 411 Law & Environment
(4 cr) July 21 – Aug 13 Flyer
Crider
This course provides students with an understanding of laws that regulate the environment as well as the skills to analyze and apply these laws to current issues. By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate with agencies, lawyers, businesses and individuals about environmental laws and determine how and whether to use legal tools to resolve environmental issues. Topics include the structure and operation of the legal system, the development of environmental laws, policy issues and risk assessment, federal and state laws applicable to habitat and species protection, air quality, water quality, toxic substances, solid and hazardous waste, energy production, government agency regulation and enforcement, citizen and public enforcement, and international environmental law.
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice
(4 cr) June 23 – July 20 Flyer Syllabus
Bacon
Environmental justice and its impact on current decisions. Focus on civil rights law, perception of risk, and relation of sustainability and equity.
ENVS 455 Sustainability
(4 cr) June 23 – July 20 Syllabus
Walker
Examines the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policymakers, environmentalists, and businesses.

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Fall 2014

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
(4 cr) Syllabus
Martin
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
(4 cr) Syllabus
Schreiner
This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis.
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) Syllabus Toadvine
This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors.
ENVS 298 Environmental Accountability and Data Visualization
(4 cr) Syllabus
Bothun
This course is designed to show how various environmental issues can be objectively framed in data aspects and how effective environmental policy can occur when the data view of the issue takes precedence over the anecdotal view. This course will also demonstrate that the gigantic effort underway to monitor emission space, land use changes, consumption patterns, transportation habits, etc, makes it possible for very accurate monitoring and subsequent accountability if this data can be made accessible to the policy world. That is the central role of data visualization – how do you represent a complex problem in an accessible format that promotes immediate understanding of the scale of the problem. This latter aspect of the course becomes possible now, given the very large and relatively easy to use open source software (OSS) visualization tools (e.g. the google playground).
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics (4 cr) Syllabus Toadvine
This course introduces key concepts and methods in environmental ethics and surveys a range of contemporary positions in this field while developing skills of value clarification and ethical reasoning applicable to areas of interdisciplinary environmental study and problem-solving. Topics covered include the interdependence of facts and values in environmental decision-making, the relation of environmental ethics to traditional ethical theory, the conceptual foundations of environmental ethics, attributions of intrinsic value and rights to nature and other species, consumption and sustainability in our conceptions of the good life, and problems of resource distribution and environmental justice. The course concludes with case studies of specific ethical problems confronting environmentalists today (recent examples include restoration of oak savanna and the Klamath River salmon controversy). Emphasizing the skills of critical thinking, value reasoning, and philosophical inquiry within an interdisciplinary context, this course guides students in the application of these skills to real-world examples requiring analysis and interpretation. The course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Arts and Letters Group.
ENVS 350 The Ecological Footprint of Energy Generation (4 cr) Syllabus Bothun
Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation, including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.
ENVS 411 Food Systems (4 cr) Course Flyer Gooch/Moore
Join us to map and explore the emerging social movement towards sustainable and just food systems. Prepare for leadership roles through critical thinking and meaningful, active engagement with hands on food projects. Read about agroecology, social systems, food justice and food politics while you intern with local community partners, and investigate the complex and diverse nature of food systems from the ground up. Looking forward to a fun semester of food!
ENVS 411 Edges (4 cr) Course Flyer Roberts
In this class you will learn about this amazing river and the people who shape its health, management and future, explore a beautiful and fascinating landscape, and discover the source of your drinking water. We will examine the geological, ecological, historical, social, and political influences within the McKenzie watershed. Fieldtrips will take us from the headwaters to confluence. We’ll hike to Great Springs, tour a farm or fish hatchery, visit a restoration project and more — to explore the various
perspectives on water use, dam management, salmon restoration and land use. And you will engage with the community through a hands-on project.
ENVS 411 Tribal Climate Change (4 cr) Course Flyer Lynn
This course will give an in depth examination of the impacts of climate change on tribal culture and sovereignty in the United States, and exploration the role of traditional ecological knowledge in understanding climate change impacts and solutions, and climate justice. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
ENVS 477 Soil Science (4 cr) Marshall
This course will introduce students to the wonderful world of soils that exist, often
forgotten, beneath our feet. Soils are one of the most fundamental ecological constraints
on patterns and processes such as plant distribution, nutrient cycling, and cycling of water
between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Soils are also an important
component of many current and historical environmental problems.

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2012-2013 Course Description, Information & Syllabi


2011-2012 Course Description, Information & Syllabi


2010-2011 Course Description and Information


Environmental Studies in the UO Catalog