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Courtesy and Adjunct Faculty

Kay Crider
Kathy Lynn
Steve Mital
Nicolae Morar
Alexandra Rempel


Kay Crider

Adjunct Professor of Environmental Studies

Kay Crider has an undergraduate degree in environmental biology from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and a J.D. with a certificate in environmental and energy law from Chicago-Kent College of Law. While in law school she was a member and editor of the Law Review and was a law clerk for the Honorable Donald P. O’Connell. Her experience includes representation of the private sector as an associate and then capital partner at a large law firm, followed by a decade of work at a national forest conservation organization. In addition to teaching for the Environmental Studies Program, Kay teaches law to MBA students at the Lundquist College of Business Center for Sustainable Business Practices and works with non-profits on a variety of matters.

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Kathy Lynn

Research Associate

Kathy Lynn

Kathy is a practitioner and applied researcher with experience in working with rural, resource-based communities and Native American tribes in the Pacific Northwest to address social, environmental and economic issues associated with climate change. Kathy coordinates the Tribal Climate Change Project, a collaboration with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station. The project focuses on building an understanding of the needs, lessons learned, and opportunities that American Indian tribes and Alaska Native communities have in planning for the physical effects of climate change and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Through this project, Kathy facilitates the Pacific Northwest Tribal Climate Change Network, which is comprised of tribes, tribal organizations, public agencies, and non-governmental groups throughout the Northwest and from across the country. Kathy has a Masters degree in Community and Regional Planning from the University of Oregon and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Haiti from 1996 to 1999. She lives in Eugene, Oregon and is mother to two lovely little girls.

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Steve Mital

Director of Sustainability

Steve Mital

Steve Mital was hired as the University of Oregon’s first Director of Sustainability in 2007. Broadly speaking he works to reduce the university’s environmental footprint and expand opportunities for faculty, staff, and students to engage sustainability issues. Steve co-manages two sustainability grant funds, one for faculty and another for students. He also manages the University of Oregon’s obligations under the American College and University President’s Climate Commitment, which include developing a plan to eliminate UO’s greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Prior to this position, Steve was an instructor in the Environmental Studies Program. During that time he founded and directed the Environmental Leadership Program which trains students to consult with non-profits, businesses, and government agencies on mapping, monitoring, and environmental education projects. Steve completed Masters degrees at the University of Oregon in Planning, Public Policy, and Management and Environmental Studies in 2001.

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Nicolae Morar

Courtesy Instructor

Nicolae received his B.A. and M.A. from Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 in France and has recently earned his PhD in Philosophy from Purdue University. His dissertation analyzes the ways in which biotechnologies alter traditional conceptions of human nature. In his current work, Nicolae approaches the notion of human nature from various perspectives: at the limit between non-human animals and humans, where he proposes a more radical solution to the moral conundrum raised by genetic chimeras; at the limit between humans and more than humans, where he claims that the argument from human nature fails to characterize genetic altering techniques as morally reprehensible. Nicolae also proposes a positive account of human nature from a biological perspective, where instead of focusing on essential similarities, he uses the notion of norm of reaction to capture the variability at heart in every human population.Nicolae has several on-going projects. He is coauthoring a paper with Dan Kelly analyzing the roles disgust (the yuck factor) should be given in our society. He is also co-editing three books. In New Directions in Biopower: Ethics and Politics in the Twenty First Century, Nicolae and V. Cisney intend to offer a book that outlines a coherent, comprehensive, and unified account of the concept of biopower by drawing together into one text the major thinkers working on this topic. In Between Deleuze and Foucault, Nicolae, along with Thomas Nail and Daniel W Smith, addresses the critical deficit regarding the convergences and confrontations of two of the towering figures of French intellectual life in the later half of the twentieth century. The same intention drives Nicolae and V. Cisney in Between Foucault and Derrida.Nicolae’s areas of specialty are in applied ethics, recent continental philosophy, and philosophy of biology, and his interests lie also in ethics, social and political philosophy, theories of sexuality, and critical theory.In the Fall, Nicolae will be teaching Environmental Ethics (ENVS 345), and he will also offer courses through the philosophy department in the winter and spring quarters.

 

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Alexandra Rempel

Courtesy Research Associate

Andie joins the Environmental Studies program after two years of practice in green building design, an experience revealing that even the lowest-energy buildings are large, expensive, long-term experiments in which performance data are rarely recorded. To bridge the gap between existing-building performance and new design, and to help regional architects and engineers develop passive heating, cooling, and ventilation systems with greater confidence, she is now documenting and modeling passive system performance in existing buildings and consulting on passive system designs. These efforts devote particular attention to the space-making potential of passive systems, as well as the restrictions they impose, so that they can be incorporated most effectively at the schematic design phase. This fall, she is co-teaching a new colloquium in the Honors College, “Energy in Transition”, which will investigate ways that societies adapt, or avoid adapting, to significant changes in their food and fuel sources. Andie’s previous research has involved mechanisms of microbial photosynthesis and respiration with applications in biohydrogen production, bioremediation, forest ecology, and atmospheric chemistry, and she welcomes discussions of ways that biological field strategies can inform field work in buildings. She holds an M.Arch. from the University of Oregon, a Ph.D. in Biology from MIT, and a B.A. in Biochemistry from Harvard College.

http://pages.uoregon.edu/arempel/

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