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Featured Alumnus: Morgan E. Peach

MorganEdwardPeach-BioPhotoMorgan E. Peach is a recent graduate of the University of Oregon Environmental Studies Master’s Program. While at the UO, his research was primarily concerned with the relationships between soil systems and the built environment and their carbon sequestration potential.

Of his work, Peach stresses that “ecological and biogeochemical dynamics are [constantly] at work…in our everyday environment. Nature is ‘in here,’ in the city or the home, not just ‘out there.’” The disproportionate effect humans have on their environments can be harnessed “through design informed by environmental science” by allowing us to “choose the degree to which our towns, cities, and managed landscapes may function as regenerative, remediating” parts of our environment. These interests are what originally drew Peach to the ENVS graduate program, as it allowed him opportunities to explore concepts in biology as well as landscape architecture.

Upon graduation he joined the Sterling College faculty in Vermont as a biology instructor, and the Red House INC., Fine Homebuilding and Historic Restoration team as a woodworker. Of his career choices he says, “as a carpenter I shape wood into useful forms; as a professor in the Sterling Biology classroom, I discuss the structure, function, and ecology of wood, all of which leads to its prominent place in building systems. There is a fulfilling correspondence between [the two].”

The UO ENVS program has particularly empowered him as a teacher, by providing unique teaching opportunities (namely the ENVS 411 program). The ability to work alongside the “many talented and passionate educators” within ENVS, he says, has given him a plethora of “pedagogical tips and tricks” that he continues to use in the classroom. He has also been inspired by the hands-on educational opportunities offered by the ENVS Environmental Leadership Program (ELP) and Classroom Community Connections (CCC), and regularly seeks to get his students outside of the classroom so they can draw connections between course content and their environment.

This summer Peach will be continuing his own interdisciplinary education at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH as an Earth, Ecosystem, and Ecological Science PhD student. Peach firmly believes in the benefits of the interdisciplinary education offered by the UO ENVS program, as it helps him “connect seemingly disparate dots, and in doing so draw closer to the imaginative, innovative solutions required in the face of unprecedented environmental and social challenges confronting the 21st-century human community.”